Top 10 myths regarding sedation and delirium in the ICU

Gregory J. Peitz, Michele C. Balas, Keith Melvin Olsen, Brenda T. Pun, E. Wesley Ely

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The management of pain, agitation, and delirium in critically ill patients can be complicated by multiple factors. Decisions to administer opioids, sedatives, and antipsychotic medications are frequently driven by a desire to facilitate patients' comfort and their tolerance of invasive procedures or other interventions within the ICU. Despite accumulating evidence supporting new strategies to optimize pain, sedation, and delirium practices in the ICU, many critical care practitioners continue to embrace false perceptions regarding appropriate management in these critically ill patients. This article explores these perceptions in more detail and offers new evidence-based strategies to help critical care practitioners better manage sedation and delirium, particularly in ICU patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCritical care medicine
Volume41
Issue number9 SUPPL.1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 12 2013

Fingerprint

Delirium
Critical Care
Critical Illness
Pain Management
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Opioid Analgesics
Antipsychotic Agents
Pain

Keywords

  • agitation
  • analgesia
  • critical care medicine
  • delirium
  • evidence-based
  • myth
  • pain
  • sedation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Peitz, G. J., Balas, M. C., Olsen, K. M., Pun, B. T., & Wesley Ely, E. (2013). Top 10 myths regarding sedation and delirium in the ICU. Critical care medicine, 41(9 SUPPL.1). https://doi.org/10.1097/CCM.0b013e3182a168f5

Top 10 myths regarding sedation and delirium in the ICU. / Peitz, Gregory J.; Balas, Michele C.; Olsen, Keith Melvin; Pun, Brenda T.; Wesley Ely, E.

In: Critical care medicine, Vol. 41, No. 9 SUPPL.1, 12.09.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Peitz, GJ, Balas, MC, Olsen, KM, Pun, BT & Wesley Ely, E 2013, 'Top 10 myths regarding sedation and delirium in the ICU', Critical care medicine, vol. 41, no. 9 SUPPL.1. https://doi.org/10.1097/CCM.0b013e3182a168f5
Peitz GJ, Balas MC, Olsen KM, Pun BT, Wesley Ely E. Top 10 myths regarding sedation and delirium in the ICU. Critical care medicine. 2013 Sep 12;41(9 SUPPL.1). https://doi.org/10.1097/CCM.0b013e3182a168f5
Peitz, Gregory J. ; Balas, Michele C. ; Olsen, Keith Melvin ; Pun, Brenda T. ; Wesley Ely, E. / Top 10 myths regarding sedation and delirium in the ICU. In: Critical care medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 41, No. 9 SUPPL.1.
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