Too many friends: Social integration, network cohesion and adolescent depressive symptoms

Christina Falci, Clea McNeely

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using a nationally representative sample of adolescents, we examine associations among social integration (network size), network cohesion (alter-density), perceptions of social relationships (e.g., social support) and adolescent depressive symptoms. We find that adolescents with either too large or too small a network have higher levels of depressive symptoms. Among girls, however, the ill effects of over-integration only occur at low levels of network cohesion. For boys, in contrast, the ill effects of over-integration only occur at high levels of network cohesion. Large social networks tend not to compromise positive perceptions of friend support or belonging; whereas, small networks are associated with low perceptions of friend support and belonging. Hence, perceptions of social relationships mediate the ill effects of under-integration, but not over-integration, on depressive symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2031-2062
Number of pages32
JournalSocial Forces
Volume87
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2009

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social integration
group cohesion
adolescent
compromise
Social Integration
Depressive Symptoms
Cohesion
social support
social network

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Too many friends : Social integration, network cohesion and adolescent depressive symptoms. / Falci, Christina; McNeely, Clea.

In: Social Forces, Vol. 87, No. 4, 01.06.2009, p. 2031-2062.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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