Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-TLR9 crosstalk dictates IL-12 family cytokine production in microglia

Monica M. Holley, Yongqing Zhang, Elin Lehrmann, William H. Wood, Kevin G. Becker, Tammy L Kielian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Microglia are the resident mononuclear phagocytes of the CNS parenchyma and represent an initial line of defense against invading microorganisms. Microglia utilize Toll-like receptors (TLRs) for pathogen recognition and TLR2 specifically senses conserved motifs of gram-positive bacteria including lipoproteins, lipoteichoic acids, and peptidoglycan (PGN) leading to cytokine/chemokine production. Interestingly, primary microglia derived from TLR2 knockout (KO) mice over-expressed numerous IL-12 family members, including IL-12p40, IL-12p70, and IL-27 in response to intact S. aureus, but not the less structurally complex TLR2 ligands Pam3CSK4 or PGN. The ability of intact bacteria to augment IL-12 family member expression was specific for gram-positive organisms, since numerous gram-negative strains were unable to elicit exaggerated responses in TLR2 KO microglia. Inhibition of SYK or IRAK4 signaling did not impact heightened IL-12 family member production in S. aureus-treated TLR2 KO microglia, whereas PI3K, MAPK, and JNK inhibitors were all capable of restoring exaggerated cytokine expression to wild type levels. Additionally, elevated IL-12 production in TLR2 KO microglia was ablated by a TLR9 antagonist, suggesting that TLR9 drives IL-12 family member production following exposure to intact bacteria that remains unchecked in the absence of TLR2 signaling. Collectively, these findings indicate crosstalk between TLR2 and TLR9 pathways to regulate IL-12 family member production by microglia. The summation of TLR signals must be tightly controlled to ensure the timely cessation and/or fine tuning of cytokine signaling to avoid nonspecific bystander damage due to sustained IL-12 release.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29-42
Number of pages14
JournalGLIA
Volume60
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

Toll-Like Receptor 2
Microglia
Interleukin-12
Cytokines
Peptidoglycan
Toll-Like Receptors
Interleukin-27
Interleukin-12 Subunit p40
Bacteria
Aptitude
Gram-Positive Bacteria
Phagocytes
Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases
Chemokines
Knockout Mice
Lipoproteins
Ligands

Keywords

  • JNK
  • MAPK
  • Microglia
  • PI3K
  • S. aureus
  • TLR2
  • TLR9

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Neurology

Cite this

Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-TLR9 crosstalk dictates IL-12 family cytokine production in microglia. / Holley, Monica M.; Zhang, Yongqing; Lehrmann, Elin; Wood, William H.; Becker, Kevin G.; Kielian, Tammy L.

In: GLIA, Vol. 60, No. 1, 01.01.2012, p. 29-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Holley, Monica M. ; Zhang, Yongqing ; Lehrmann, Elin ; Wood, William H. ; Becker, Kevin G. ; Kielian, Tammy L. / Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-TLR9 crosstalk dictates IL-12 family cytokine production in microglia. In: GLIA. 2012 ; Vol. 60, No. 1. pp. 29-42.
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