Three types of Demand-Controlled Ventilation logic in a single zone system with transient analysis

Xingbin Lin, Josephine Lau

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Demand-Controlled Ventilation (DCV) is defined as "a system that provides automatic reduction of outdoor air intake below design rates when the actual occupancy of spaces served by the system is less than design occupancy". Currently, several widely used DCV control approaches are developed based on steady-state equation. This paper presents three transient DCV mathematical models for CO2 concentration calculation. The selected transient model provides a more realistic estimation on CO2 concentration and prediction on the outdoor airflow rate. The transient CO2 concentration is used to calculate the required minimum outdoor air flow rate with three control approaches respectively. In this case study, a typical occupancy profile is selected, and the required minimum outdoor air flow rates based on Standard 62.1 are compared to identify the possibilities of over-ventilating and underventilating. The results show that MTP would provide sufficient ventilation with the least over-ventilation in the particular case study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011
Pages1162-1167
Number of pages6
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011
Event12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011 - Austin, TX, United States
Duration: Jun 5 2011Jun 10 2011

Publication series

Name12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011
Volume2

Other

Other12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011
CountryUnited States
CityAustin, TX
Period6/5/116/10/11

Fingerprint

Transient analysis
Ventilation
Flow rate
Air intakes
Air
Mathematical models

Keywords

  • Control logic
  • Demand-controlled ventilation
  • Transient model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution

Cite this

Lin, X., & Lau, J. (2011). Three types of Demand-Controlled Ventilation logic in a single zone system with transient analysis. In 12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011 (pp. 1162-1167). (12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011; Vol. 2).

Three types of Demand-Controlled Ventilation logic in a single zone system with transient analysis. / Lin, Xingbin; Lau, Josephine.

12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011. 2011. p. 1162-1167 (12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011; Vol. 2).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Lin, X & Lau, J 2011, Three types of Demand-Controlled Ventilation logic in a single zone system with transient analysis. in 12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011. 12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011, vol. 2, pp. 1162-1167, 12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011, Austin, TX, United States, 6/5/11.
Lin X, Lau J. Three types of Demand-Controlled Ventilation logic in a single zone system with transient analysis. In 12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011. 2011. p. 1162-1167. (12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011).
Lin, Xingbin ; Lau, Josephine. / Three types of Demand-Controlled Ventilation logic in a single zone system with transient analysis. 12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011. 2011. pp. 1162-1167 (12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011).
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