Thermal shrinkage stress in high-speed-spun, high molecular weight poly(ethylene terephthalate) filaments

Jung Y Lim, Sang Yong Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High-speed spinning of poly(ethylene terephthalate) with an intrinsic viscosity of 0.98 dL/g was performed at a take-up velocity of 2.5-5.5 km/min, and the effects of the fiber structure on the isothermal and nonisothermal shrinkage-stress evolution in as-spun filaments were investigated. In isothermal measurements, the peak shrinkage stress was consistent with the degree of amorphous orientation, whereas the so-called frozen stress relaxation was rather constant with respect to the take-up velocity. The maximum shrinkage stress in nonisothermal testing was also consistent with an amorphous orientation. A spontaneous elongation phenomenon took place for filaments spun at 2.5 and 3 km/min that resulted in the lowering of shrinkage stresses in both experiments. A simple calculation showed that the inertial force in the spin line was about half of the resultant shrinkage force. Filaments spun at 5.5 km/min had markedly lower shrinkage stresses and shrinkage with respect to the degree of amorphous orientation. This was attributed to the fiber structure, which gave a much lower loss-tangent maximum for these filaments. In addition, a hypothetical model is proposed suggesting the possibility that filaments spun at 5.5 km/min may have narrow tie-chain-length distributions that provide relatively longer shortest tie molecules.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)964-972
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Polymer Science, Part B: Polymer Physics
Volume39
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2001

Fingerprint

Polyethylene Terephthalates
polyethylene terephthalate
shrinkage
Polyethylene terephthalates
molecular weight
filaments
Molecular weight
high speed
fibers
Fibers
stress relaxation
Stress relaxation
Hot Temperature
Chain length
tangents
inertia
metal spinning
elongation
Elongation
Viscosity

Keywords

  • Amorphous orientation
  • High-speed spinning
  • Poly(ethylene terephthalate) filaments
  • Shrinkage stress
  • Tie-chain-length distribution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Thermal shrinkage stress in high-speed-spun, high molecular weight poly(ethylene terephthalate) filaments. / Lim, Jung Y; Kim, Sang Yong.

In: Journal of Polymer Science, Part B: Polymer Physics, Vol. 39, No. 9, 01.05.2001, p. 964-972.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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