Theory of forward and reverse middle-ear transmission applied to otoacoustic emissions in infant and adult ears

Douglas H Keefe, Carolina Abdala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to understand why otoacoustic emission (OAE) levels are higher in normal-hearing human infants relative to adults. In a previous study, distortion product (DP) OAE input/output (I/O) functions were shown to differ at f2 =6 kHz in adults compared to infants through 6 months of age. These DPOAE I/O functions were used to noninvasively assess immaturities in forward/reverse transmission through the ear canal and middle ear [Abdala, C., and Keefe, D. H., (2006). J. Acoust Soc. Am. 120, 3832-3842]. In the present study, ear-canal reflectance and DPOAEs measured in the same ears were analyzed using a scattering-matrix model of forward and reverse transmission in the ear canal, middle ear, and cochlea. Reflectance measurements were sensitive to frequency-dependent effects of ear-canal and middle-ear transmission that differed across OAE type and subject age. Results indicated that DPOAE levels were larger in infants mainly because the reverse middle-ear transmittance level varied with ear-canal area, which differed by more than a factor of 7 between term infants and adults. The forward middle-ear transmittance level was -16 dB less in infants, so that the conductive efficiency was poorer in infants than adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)978-993
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume121
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 6 2007

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middle ear
ear
canals
transmittance
reflectance
cochlea
output
S matrix theory
hearing
Ear
Middle Ear
Canals
products

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Theory of forward and reverse middle-ear transmission applied to otoacoustic emissions in infant and adult ears. / Keefe, Douglas H; Abdala, Carolina.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 121, No. 2, 06.02.2007, p. 978-993.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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