Theories of change and outcomes in home-based Early Head Start programs

Helen Raikes, Lori A. Roggman, Carla A. Peterson, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Rachel Chazan-Cohen, Xiaoyun Zhang, Rachel F. Schiffman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Programs to promote children's early development are based on a set of assumptions, explicit or implicit, about intended outcomes and how the program will effect change. The "theories of change" were examined in ten home-based programs in the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project (EHSREP), using data collected through multiple interviews with program staff. All home-based programs indicated that parenting outcomes were among their highest three priorities, while only 4 of 10 programs said that child outcomes were in their top priorities. The pattern of outcome differences between randomly-assigned program and control group participants reflected the programs' theories of change in several ways. Early Head Start home-based programs showed positive impacts on 9 of 9 parenting outcomes, including parental supportiveness, home language and learning supports, emotional responsiveness, and family conflict when children were 24 months of age. Significant program impacts on child cognitive skills (Bayley MDI scores) and social behavior (observed child engagement of parent during play) were found when children were 36 months of age. Mediation analyses showed that the 54% of the program impact on 36-month child cognitive scores was mediated by 24-month program impacts on parental supportiveness, language and learning support, emotional responsiveness, and family conflict, and 47% of the program impact on 36-month child engagement of parent was mediated by 24-month impacts on parental supportiveness, language and cognitive stimulation, and emotional responsiveness. Results from mediation analyses were consistent with these home-based programs' theories of change, supporting the efficacy of focusing on parent change as a mechanism for child outcomes in home visiting programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)574-585
Number of pages12
JournalEarly Childhood Research Quarterly
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Family Conflict
Language
Parenting
Learning
parents
Social Behavior
Child Development
mediation
language
parental home
Interviews
Control Groups
social behavior
learning
staff
interview
evaluation
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Raikes, H., Roggman, L. A., Peterson, C. A., Brooks-Gunn, J., Chazan-Cohen, R., Zhang, X., & Schiffman, R. F. (2014). Theories of change and outcomes in home-based Early Head Start programs. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 29(4), 574-585. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2014.05.003

Theories of change and outcomes in home-based Early Head Start programs. / Raikes, Helen; Roggman, Lori A.; Peterson, Carla A.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Chazan-Cohen, Rachel; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Schiffman, Rachel F.

In: Early Childhood Research Quarterly, Vol. 29, No. 4, 01.01.2014, p. 574-585.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Raikes, H, Roggman, LA, Peterson, CA, Brooks-Gunn, J, Chazan-Cohen, R, Zhang, X & Schiffman, RF 2014, 'Theories of change and outcomes in home-based Early Head Start programs', Early Childhood Research Quarterly, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 574-585. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2014.05.003
Raikes, Helen ; Roggman, Lori A. ; Peterson, Carla A. ; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne ; Chazan-Cohen, Rachel ; Zhang, Xiaoyun ; Schiffman, Rachel F. / Theories of change and outcomes in home-based Early Head Start programs. In: Early Childhood Research Quarterly. 2014 ; Vol. 29, No. 4. pp. 574-585.
@article{44c4d3b3c53c4fb188b0fe8fefe7083d,
title = "Theories of change and outcomes in home-based Early Head Start programs",
abstract = "Programs to promote children's early development are based on a set of assumptions, explicit or implicit, about intended outcomes and how the program will effect change. The {"}theories of change{"} were examined in ten home-based programs in the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project (EHSREP), using data collected through multiple interviews with program staff. All home-based programs indicated that parenting outcomes were among their highest three priorities, while only 4 of 10 programs said that child outcomes were in their top priorities. The pattern of outcome differences between randomly-assigned program and control group participants reflected the programs' theories of change in several ways. Early Head Start home-based programs showed positive impacts on 9 of 9 parenting outcomes, including parental supportiveness, home language and learning supports, emotional responsiveness, and family conflict when children were 24 months of age. Significant program impacts on child cognitive skills (Bayley MDI scores) and social behavior (observed child engagement of parent during play) were found when children were 36 months of age. Mediation analyses showed that the 54{\%} of the program impact on 36-month child cognitive scores was mediated by 24-month program impacts on parental supportiveness, language and learning support, emotional responsiveness, and family conflict, and 47{\%} of the program impact on 36-month child engagement of parent was mediated by 24-month impacts on parental supportiveness, language and cognitive stimulation, and emotional responsiveness. Results from mediation analyses were consistent with these home-based programs' theories of change, supporting the efficacy of focusing on parent change as a mechanism for child outcomes in home visiting programs.",
author = "Helen Raikes and Roggman, {Lori A.} and Peterson, {Carla A.} and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn and Rachel Chazan-Cohen and Xiaoyun Zhang and Schiffman, {Rachel F.}",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ecresq.2014.05.003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
pages = "574--585",
journal = "Early Childhood Research Quarterly",
issn = "0885-2006",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Theories of change and outcomes in home-based Early Head Start programs

AU - Raikes, Helen

AU - Roggman, Lori A.

AU - Peterson, Carla A.

AU - Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

AU - Chazan-Cohen, Rachel

AU - Zhang, Xiaoyun

AU - Schiffman, Rachel F.

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Programs to promote children's early development are based on a set of assumptions, explicit or implicit, about intended outcomes and how the program will effect change. The "theories of change" were examined in ten home-based programs in the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project (EHSREP), using data collected through multiple interviews with program staff. All home-based programs indicated that parenting outcomes were among their highest three priorities, while only 4 of 10 programs said that child outcomes were in their top priorities. The pattern of outcome differences between randomly-assigned program and control group participants reflected the programs' theories of change in several ways. Early Head Start home-based programs showed positive impacts on 9 of 9 parenting outcomes, including parental supportiveness, home language and learning supports, emotional responsiveness, and family conflict when children were 24 months of age. Significant program impacts on child cognitive skills (Bayley MDI scores) and social behavior (observed child engagement of parent during play) were found when children were 36 months of age. Mediation analyses showed that the 54% of the program impact on 36-month child cognitive scores was mediated by 24-month program impacts on parental supportiveness, language and learning support, emotional responsiveness, and family conflict, and 47% of the program impact on 36-month child engagement of parent was mediated by 24-month impacts on parental supportiveness, language and cognitive stimulation, and emotional responsiveness. Results from mediation analyses were consistent with these home-based programs' theories of change, supporting the efficacy of focusing on parent change as a mechanism for child outcomes in home visiting programs.

AB - Programs to promote children's early development are based on a set of assumptions, explicit or implicit, about intended outcomes and how the program will effect change. The "theories of change" were examined in ten home-based programs in the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project (EHSREP), using data collected through multiple interviews with program staff. All home-based programs indicated that parenting outcomes were among their highest three priorities, while only 4 of 10 programs said that child outcomes were in their top priorities. The pattern of outcome differences between randomly-assigned program and control group participants reflected the programs' theories of change in several ways. Early Head Start home-based programs showed positive impacts on 9 of 9 parenting outcomes, including parental supportiveness, home language and learning supports, emotional responsiveness, and family conflict when children were 24 months of age. Significant program impacts on child cognitive skills (Bayley MDI scores) and social behavior (observed child engagement of parent during play) were found when children were 36 months of age. Mediation analyses showed that the 54% of the program impact on 36-month child cognitive scores was mediated by 24-month program impacts on parental supportiveness, language and learning support, emotional responsiveness, and family conflict, and 47% of the program impact on 36-month child engagement of parent was mediated by 24-month impacts on parental supportiveness, language and cognitive stimulation, and emotional responsiveness. Results from mediation analyses were consistent with these home-based programs' theories of change, supporting the efficacy of focusing on parent change as a mechanism for child outcomes in home visiting programs.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84927125918&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84927125918&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ecresq.2014.05.003

DO - 10.1016/j.ecresq.2014.05.003

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 574

EP - 585

JO - Early Childhood Research Quarterly

JF - Early Childhood Research Quarterly

SN - 0885-2006

IS - 4

ER -