The Veteran-Initiated Electronic Care Coordination: A Multisite Initiative to Promote and Evaluate Consumer-Mediated Health Information Exchange

Dawn M. Klein, Kassi Pham, Leila Samy, Adam Bluth, Kim M. Nazi, Matthew Witry, J. Stacey Klutts, Kathleen M. Grant, Adi V. Gundlapalli, Gary Kochersberger, Laurie Pfeiffer, Sergio Romero, Brian Vetter, Carolyn L. Turvey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Information continuity is critical to person-centered care when patients receive care from multiple healthcare systems. Patients can access their electronic health record data through patient portals to facilitate information exchange. This pilot was developed to improve care continuity for rural Veterans by (1) promoting the use of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) patient portal to share health information with non-VA providers, and (2) evaluating the impact of health information sharing at a community appointment. Materials and Methods: Veterans from nine VA healthcare systems were trained to access and share their VA Continuity of Care Document (CCD) with their non-VA providers. Patients and non-VA providers completed surveys on their experiences. Results: Participants (n = 620) were primarily older, white, and Vietnam era Veterans. After training, 78% reported the CCD would help them be more involved in their healthcare and 86% planned to share it regularly with non-VA providers. Veterans (n = 256) then attended 277 community appointments. Provider responses from these appointments (n = 133) indicated they were confident in the accuracy of the information (97%) and wanted to continue to receive the CCD (96%). Ninety percent of providers reported the CCD improved their ability to have an accurate medication list and helped them make medication treatment decisions. Fifty percent reported they did not order a laboratory test or another procedure because of information available in the CCD. Conclusions: This pilot demonstrates feasibility and value of patient access to a CCD to facilitate information sharing between VA and non-VA providers. Outreach and targeted education are needed to promote consumer-mediated health information exchange.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)264-272
Number of pages9
JournalTelemedicine and e-Health
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2017

Fingerprint

Consumer Health Information
Veterans
Continuity of Patient Care
Appointments and Schedules
Information Dissemination
Delivery of Health Care
Health Information Exchange
Vietnam
Electronic Health Records
Health
Patient Care
Education

Keywords

  • E-health
  • continuity of care
  • education
  • information management
  • medical records
  • personal health records
  • telehealth
  • telemedicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management

Cite this

The Veteran-Initiated Electronic Care Coordination : A Multisite Initiative to Promote and Evaluate Consumer-Mediated Health Information Exchange. / Klein, Dawn M.; Pham, Kassi; Samy, Leila; Bluth, Adam; Nazi, Kim M.; Witry, Matthew; Klutts, J. Stacey; Grant, Kathleen M.; Gundlapalli, Adi V.; Kochersberger, Gary; Pfeiffer, Laurie; Romero, Sergio; Vetter, Brian; Turvey, Carolyn L.

In: Telemedicine and e-Health, Vol. 23, No. 4, 04.2017, p. 264-272.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Klein, DM, Pham, K, Samy, L, Bluth, A, Nazi, KM, Witry, M, Klutts, JS, Grant, KM, Gundlapalli, AV, Kochersberger, G, Pfeiffer, L, Romero, S, Vetter, B & Turvey, CL 2017, 'The Veteran-Initiated Electronic Care Coordination: A Multisite Initiative to Promote and Evaluate Consumer-Mediated Health Information Exchange', Telemedicine and e-Health, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 264-272. https://doi.org/10.1089/tmj.2016.0078
Klein, Dawn M. ; Pham, Kassi ; Samy, Leila ; Bluth, Adam ; Nazi, Kim M. ; Witry, Matthew ; Klutts, J. Stacey ; Grant, Kathleen M. ; Gundlapalli, Adi V. ; Kochersberger, Gary ; Pfeiffer, Laurie ; Romero, Sergio ; Vetter, Brian ; Turvey, Carolyn L. / The Veteran-Initiated Electronic Care Coordination : A Multisite Initiative to Promote and Evaluate Consumer-Mediated Health Information Exchange. In: Telemedicine and e-Health. 2017 ; Vol. 23, No. 4. pp. 264-272.
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abstract = "Introduction: Information continuity is critical to person-centered care when patients receive care from multiple healthcare systems. Patients can access their electronic health record data through patient portals to facilitate information exchange. This pilot was developed to improve care continuity for rural Veterans by (1) promoting the use of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) patient portal to share health information with non-VA providers, and (2) evaluating the impact of health information sharing at a community appointment. Materials and Methods: Veterans from nine VA healthcare systems were trained to access and share their VA Continuity of Care Document (CCD) with their non-VA providers. Patients and non-VA providers completed surveys on their experiences. Results: Participants (n = 620) were primarily older, white, and Vietnam era Veterans. After training, 78{\%} reported the CCD would help them be more involved in their healthcare and 86{\%} planned to share it regularly with non-VA providers. Veterans (n = 256) then attended 277 community appointments. Provider responses from these appointments (n = 133) indicated they were confident in the accuracy of the information (97{\%}) and wanted to continue to receive the CCD (96{\%}). Ninety percent of providers reported the CCD improved their ability to have an accurate medication list and helped them make medication treatment decisions. Fifty percent reported they did not order a laboratory test or another procedure because of information available in the CCD. Conclusions: This pilot demonstrates feasibility and value of patient access to a CCD to facilitate information sharing between VA and non-VA providers. Outreach and targeted education are needed to promote consumer-mediated health information exchange.",
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AU - Samy, Leila

AU - Bluth, Adam

AU - Nazi, Kim M.

AU - Witry, Matthew

AU - Klutts, J. Stacey

AU - Grant, Kathleen M.

AU - Gundlapalli, Adi V.

AU - Kochersberger, Gary

AU - Pfeiffer, Laurie

AU - Romero, Sergio

AU - Vetter, Brian

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N2 - Introduction: Information continuity is critical to person-centered care when patients receive care from multiple healthcare systems. Patients can access their electronic health record data through patient portals to facilitate information exchange. This pilot was developed to improve care continuity for rural Veterans by (1) promoting the use of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) patient portal to share health information with non-VA providers, and (2) evaluating the impact of health information sharing at a community appointment. Materials and Methods: Veterans from nine VA healthcare systems were trained to access and share their VA Continuity of Care Document (CCD) with their non-VA providers. Patients and non-VA providers completed surveys on their experiences. Results: Participants (n = 620) were primarily older, white, and Vietnam era Veterans. After training, 78% reported the CCD would help them be more involved in their healthcare and 86% planned to share it regularly with non-VA providers. Veterans (n = 256) then attended 277 community appointments. Provider responses from these appointments (n = 133) indicated they were confident in the accuracy of the information (97%) and wanted to continue to receive the CCD (96%). Ninety percent of providers reported the CCD improved their ability to have an accurate medication list and helped them make medication treatment decisions. Fifty percent reported they did not order a laboratory test or another procedure because of information available in the CCD. Conclusions: This pilot demonstrates feasibility and value of patient access to a CCD to facilitate information sharing between VA and non-VA providers. Outreach and targeted education are needed to promote consumer-mediated health information exchange.

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