The use of a force-controlled dynamic knee simulator to quantify the mechanical performance of total knee replacement designs during functional activity

John D. Desjardins, Peter S. Walker, Hani Haider, John Perry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

89 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The experimental evaluation of any total knee replacement (TKR) design should include the pre-implantation quantification of its mechanical performance during tests that simulate the common activities of daily living. To date, few dynamic TKR simulation studies have been conducted before implantation. Once in vivo, the accurate and reproducible assessment of TKR design mechanics is exceedingly difficult, with the secondary variables of the patient and the surgical technique hindering research. The current study utilizes a 6-degree-of-freedom force-controlled knee simulator to quantify the effect of TKR design alone on TKR mechanics during a simulated walking cycle. Results show that all eight TKR designs tested elicited statistically different measures of tibial/femoral kinematics, simulated soft tissue loading, and implant geometric restraint loading during an identical simulated gait cycle, and that these differences were a direct result of TKR design alone. Maximum ranges of tibial kinematics over the eight designs tested were from 0.8mm anterior to 6.4mm posterior tibial displacement, and 14.1° internal to 6.0°external tibial rotation during the walking cycle. Soft tissue and implant reaction forces ranged from 106 and 222N anteriorly to 19 and 127N posteriorly, and from 1.6 and 1.8Nm internally to 3.5 and 5.9Nm externally, respectively. These measures provide valuable experimental insight into the effect of TKR design alone on simulated in vivo TKR kinematics, bone interface loading and soft tissue loading. Future studies utilizing this methodology should investigate the effect of experimentally controlled variations in surgical and patient factors on TKR performance during simulated dynamic activity. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1231-1242
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Biomechanics
Volume33
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2000

Fingerprint

Knee prostheses
Knee Replacement Arthroplasties
Knee
Simulators
Biomechanical Phenomena
Kinematics
Tissue
Mechanics
Walking
Activities of Daily Living
Thigh
Gait
Bone
Research Design

Keywords

  • Knee simulator
  • TKR kinematics
  • TKR loading
  • Total knee replacement design
  • Walking cycle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

The use of a force-controlled dynamic knee simulator to quantify the mechanical performance of total knee replacement designs during functional activity. / Desjardins, John D.; Walker, Peter S.; Haider, Hani; Perry, John.

In: Journal of Biomechanics, Vol. 33, No. 10, 01.10.2000, p. 1231-1242.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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