The significance of the Default Mode Network (DMN) in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders

A review

Akansha Mohan, Aaron J. Roberto, Abhishek Mohan, Aileen Lorenzo, Kathryn Jones, Martin J. Carney, Luis Liogier-Weyback, Soonjo Hwang, Kyle A B Lapidus

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relationship of cortical structure and specific neuronal circuitry to global brain function, particularly its perturbations related to the development and progression of neuropathology, is an area of great interest in neurobehavioral science. Disruption of these neural networks can be associated with a wide range of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Herein we review activity of the Default Mode Network (DMN) in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Epilepsy (Temporal Lobe Epilepsy - TLE), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and mood disorders. We discuss the implications of DMN disruptions and their relationship to the neurocognitive model of each disease entity, the utility of DMN assessment in clinical evaluation, and the changes of the DMN following treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-57
Number of pages9
JournalYale Journal of Biology and Medicine
Volume89
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

Nervous System Diseases
Temporal Lobe Epilepsy
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Mood Disorders
Parkinson Disease
Epilepsy
Alzheimer Disease
Brain
Neural networks
Neuropathology

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
  • Default Mode Network
  • Mood disorder
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Resting State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Mohan, A., Roberto, A. J., Mohan, A., Lorenzo, A., Jones, K., Carney, M. J., ... Lapidus, K. A. B. (2016). The significance of the Default Mode Network (DMN) in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders: A review. Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, 89(1), 49-57.

The significance of the Default Mode Network (DMN) in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders : A review. / Mohan, Akansha; Roberto, Aaron J.; Mohan, Abhishek; Lorenzo, Aileen; Jones, Kathryn; Carney, Martin J.; Liogier-Weyback, Luis; Hwang, Soonjo; Lapidus, Kyle A B.

In: Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, Vol. 89, No. 1, 01.03.2016, p. 49-57.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Mohan, A, Roberto, AJ, Mohan, A, Lorenzo, A, Jones, K, Carney, MJ, Liogier-Weyback, L, Hwang, S & Lapidus, KAB 2016, 'The significance of the Default Mode Network (DMN) in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders: A review', Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, vol. 89, no. 1, pp. 49-57.
Mohan, Akansha ; Roberto, Aaron J. ; Mohan, Abhishek ; Lorenzo, Aileen ; Jones, Kathryn ; Carney, Martin J. ; Liogier-Weyback, Luis ; Hwang, Soonjo ; Lapidus, Kyle A B. / The significance of the Default Mode Network (DMN) in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders : A review. In: Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 89, No. 1. pp. 49-57.
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