The Significance of Self‐Reported Anxious Symptoms in First Grade Children: Prediction to Anxious Symptoms and Adaptive Functioning in Fifth Grade

Nick Ialongo, Gail Edelsohn, Lisa Werthamer‐Larsson, Lisa Crockett, Sheppard Kellam

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181 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Abstract In an earlier study of an epidemiologically defined sample of first grade children, primarily between die ages of 5 and 6, self‐reported anxious symptoms proved relatively stable and were significantly related to adaptive Functioning. In the present study we follow that cohort of first graders longitudinally and assess the prognostic value of self‐reports of anxious symptoms in first grade with respect to anxious symptoms and adaptive functioning in the late elementary school years or al about age 10. Fist grade anxious symptoms were found to have significant prognostic value in terms of levels of anxious symptoms and adaptive functioning in fifth grade.In an earlier study of an epidemiologically defined sample of first grade children, primarily between die ages of 5 and 6, self‐reported anxious symptoms proved relatively stable and were significantly related to adaptive Functioning. In the present study we follow that cohort of first graders longitudinally and assess the prognostic value of self‐reports of anxious symptoms in first grade with respect to anxious symptoms and adaptive functioning in the late elementary school years or al about age 10. Fist grade anxious symptoms were found to have significant prognostic value in terms of levels of anxious symptoms and adaptive functioning in fifth grade.In an earlier study of an epidemiologically defined sample of first grade children, primarily between die ages of 5 and 6, self‐reported anxious symptoms proved relatively stable and were significantly related to adaptive Functioning. In the present study we follow that cohort of first graders longitudinally and assess the prognostic value of self‐reports of anxious symptoms in first grade with respect to anxious symptoms and adaptive functioning in the late elementary school years or al about age 10. Fist grade anxious symptoms were found to have significant prognostic value in terms of levels of anxious symptoms and adaptive functioning in fifth grade.In an earlier study of an epidemiologically defined sample of first grade children, primarily between die ages of 5 and 6, self‐reported anxious symptoms proved relatively stable and were significantly related to adaptive Functioning. In the present study we follow that cohort of first graders longitudinally and assess the prognostic value of self‐reports of anxious symptoms in first grade with respect to anxious symptoms and adaptive functioning in the late elementary school years or al about age 10. Fist grade anxious symptoms were found to have significant prognostic value in terms of levels of anxious symptoms and adaptive functioning in fifth grade.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)427-437
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1995

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Keywords

  • Anxious symptoms
  • longitudinal
  • school‐age children

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The Significance of Self‐Reported Anxious Symptoms in First Grade Children : Prediction to Anxious Symptoms and Adaptive Functioning in Fifth Grade. / Ialongo, Nick; Edelsohn, Gail; Werthamer‐Larsson, Lisa; Crockett, Lisa; Kellam, Sheppard.

In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Vol. 36, No. 3, 03.1995, p. 427-437.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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