The role of sentence position, allomorph, and morpheme type on accurate use of s-related morphemes by children who are hard of hearing

Keegan Koehlinger, Amanda Owen Van Horne, Jacob Oleson, Ryan W McCreery, Mary Pat Moeller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Production accuracy of s-related morphemes was examined in 3-year-olds with mild-to-severe hearing loss, focusing on perceptibility, articulation, and input frequency. Method: Morphemes with /s/, /z/, and /ɪz/ as allomorphs (plural, possessive, third-person singular –s, and auxiliary and copula “is”) were analyzed from language samples gathered from 51 children (ages: 2;10 [years;months] to 3;8) who are hard of hearing (HH), all of whom used amplification. Articulation was assessed via the Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation–Second Edition, and monomorphemic word final /s/ and /z/ production. Hearing was measured via better ear pure tone average, unaided Speech Intelligibility Index, and aided sensation level of speech at 4 kHz. Results: Unlike results reported for children with normal hearing, the group of children who are HH correctly produced the /ɪz/ allomorph more than /s/ and /z/ allomorphs. Relative accuracy levels for morphemes and sentence positions paralleled those of children with normal hearing. The 4-kHz sensation level scores (but not the better ear pure tone average or Speech Intelligibility Index), the Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation–Second Edition, and word final s/z use all predicted accuracy. Conclusions: Both better hearing and higher articulation scores are associated with improved morpheme production, and better aided audibility in the high frequencies and word final production of s/z are particularly critical for morpheme acquisition in children who are HH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)396-409
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume58
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

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Hearing
Speech Intelligibility
edition
Ear
Morpheme
Morpheme Type
Hearing Loss
human being
Language
language
Group
Articulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

The role of sentence position, allomorph, and morpheme type on accurate use of s-related morphemes by children who are hard of hearing. / Koehlinger, Keegan; Van Horne, Amanda Owen; Oleson, Jacob; McCreery, Ryan W; Moeller, Mary Pat.

In: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Vol. 58, No. 2, 01.04.2015, p. 396-409.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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