The role of second-generation antifungal triazoles for treatment of the endemic mycoses

Alison G. Freifeld, J. Ryan Bariola, David Andes

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Endemic fungi are geographically restricted to certain areas of the United States where they are typically found in soil. They often cause asymptomatic or self-limited flu-like infections in humans. Occasionally, they cause serious human disease including acute or chronic pneumonias, or bone, skin, or central nervous system disease. Amphotericin B and first-generation triazoles are standard therapy for serious endemic fungal infections. Adverse effects, drug intolerance, and rare refractory infections may limit their use; therefore, experience is increasing using newer triazoles (voriconazole and posaconazole) to potentially circumvent these problems. This article reviews the basic scientific information and clinical experience using triazoles for treating endemic fungal infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)471-478
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent Infectious Disease Reports
Volume12
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010

Fingerprint

Triazoles
Mycoses
Central Nervous System Diseases
Amphotericin B
Acute Disease
Infection
Pneumonia
Chronic Disease
Fungi
Soil
Bone and Bones
Skin
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Antifungal agents
  • Blastomycosis
  • Coccidioidomycosis
  • Histoplasmosis
  • Triazoles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

The role of second-generation antifungal triazoles for treatment of the endemic mycoses. / Freifeld, Alison G.; Bariola, J. Ryan; Andes, David.

In: Current Infectious Disease Reports, Vol. 12, No. 6, 01.11.2010, p. 471-478.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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