The role of pubertal timing and temperamental vulnerability in adolescents' internalizing symptoms

Elizabeth J Crockett, Gustavo Carlo, Jennifer M. Wolff, Meredith O. Hope

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This longitudinal study examined the joint role of pubertal timing and temperament variables (emotional reactivity and self-regulation) in predicting adolescents' internalizing symptoms. The multiethnic sample included 1,025 adolescent girls and boys followed from age 11 to age 15 (M age = 11.03 years at Time 1). In structural equation models, age 11 measures of pubertal timing, emotional reactivity, and self-regulation and their interactions were used to predict adolescents' internalizing behavior concurrently and at age 15. Results indicated that, among girls, early pubertal timing, higher emotional reactivity, and lower self-regulation predicted increased internalizing behavior. In addition, self-regulation moderated the effect of pubertal timing such that effects of earlier timing on subsequent internalizing were seen primarily among girls with relatively poor self-regulation. Among boys, higher levels of emotional reactivity and lower self-regulation predicted increased internalizing, but there were no effects of pubertal timing. After controlling for Time 1 internalizing symptoms, only self-regulation predicted change in internalizing symptoms. Discussion focuses on the possible interplay of temperament and pubertal development in predicting internalizing problems during adolescence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)377-389
Number of pages13
JournalDevelopment and Psychopathology
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2013

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Temperament
Adolescent Behavior
Structural Models
Self-Control
Longitudinal Studies
Joints

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The role of pubertal timing and temperamental vulnerability in adolescents' internalizing symptoms. / Crockett, Elizabeth J; Carlo, Gustavo; Wolff, Jennifer M.; Hope, Meredith O.

In: Development and Psychopathology, Vol. 25, No. 2, 01.05.2013, p. 377-389.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crockett, Elizabeth J ; Carlo, Gustavo ; Wolff, Jennifer M. ; Hope, Meredith O. / The role of pubertal timing and temperamental vulnerability in adolescents' internalizing symptoms. In: Development and Psychopathology. 2013 ; Vol. 25, No. 2. pp. 377-389.
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