The role of maternal psychosocial perceptions in parent-training programs: A preliminary randomized controlled trial

Rebecca M. Alper, Richard R. Hurtig, Karla K. McGregor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Parent-child interaction is critical for early language and literacy development. Parent training programs have proliferated to support early interactions. However, many environmental and psychosocial factors can impact the quality of parent-child language and literacy interactions as well as training program outcomes. This preliminary randomized controlled trial examined maternal perceived self-efficacy and locus of control during a language and literacy parent training program. Thirty mother-child dyads (mother age 21-40; children 2;6-4;0) were assigned in parallel to the training or control group. The training was efficacious for mothers and children - training-group dyads made significantly greater gains in maternal strategy use, responsivity, and child print awareness than the control group. Gains were maintained one month post-training. Children whose mothers had more external baseline control perceptions identified significantly fewer print targets at baseline and made greater gains than those with more internal control perceptions. Future directions and implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Child Language
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

parents training
training program
Randomized Controlled Trials
Mothers
Education
literacy
dyad
parents
interaction
language
Child Language
Control Groups
Language Development
Internal-External Control
Self Efficacy
Group
psychosocial factors
locus of control
Randomized Controlled Trial
Language

Keywords

  • early language
  • locus of control
  • parent training
  • print awareness
  • self-efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

The role of maternal psychosocial perceptions in parent-training programs : A preliminary randomized controlled trial. / Alper, Rebecca M.; Hurtig, Richard R.; McGregor, Karla K.

In: Journal of Child Language, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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