The role of exposures to animals and other risk factors in sporadic, non-typhoidal Salmonella infections in Michigan children

M. Younus, M. J. Wilkins, Herbert Dele Davies, M. H. Rahbar, J. Funk, C. Nguyen, A. E. Siddiqi, S. Cho, A. M. Saeed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Salmonellosis is largely a major foodborne disease. However, contact with animals particularly reptiles, has been increasingly recognized as a risk factor for Salmonella infection among children. The major risk factors for salmonellosis in Michigan children have not been assessed. Therefore, we have evaluated the association between Salmonella infections and contact with animals among Michigan children aged ≤10 years by conducting a population-based case-control study. A total of 123 children with laboratory-confirmed Salmonella infections and 139 control children, who had not experienced symptoms of gastrointestinal illness during the month prior to the interviews, were enrolled. A multivariable analysis matched on age group revealed that children with Salmonella infections had reported more commonly than controls contact with reptiles [adjusted matched odds ratio (MOR) = 7.90, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.52-41.01] and cats (MOR = 2.53, 95% CI: 1.14-5.88). Results of this study suggest an association between salmonellosis and contact with cats and reptiles in Michigan children. Additional efforts are needed to educate caretakers of young children about the risk of Salmonella transmission through animal contact.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalZoonoses and Public Health
Volume57
Issue number7-8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

Fingerprint

Salmonella Infections
salmonellosis
risk factors
Reptiles
animals
reptiles
odds ratio
confidence interval
Cats
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
cats
Foodborne Diseases
Infection Control
foodborne illness
case-control studies
Salmonella
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
Case-Control Studies
interviews

Keywords

  • Animals
  • Case-control
  • Cats
  • Michigan
  • Reptiles
  • Salmonella

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • veterinary(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

The role of exposures to animals and other risk factors in sporadic, non-typhoidal Salmonella infections in Michigan children. / Younus, M.; Wilkins, M. J.; Davies, Herbert Dele; Rahbar, M. H.; Funk, J.; Nguyen, C.; Siddiqi, A. E.; Cho, S.; Saeed, A. M.

In: Zoonoses and Public Health, Vol. 57, No. 7-8, 01.12.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Younus, M. ; Wilkins, M. J. ; Davies, Herbert Dele ; Rahbar, M. H. ; Funk, J. ; Nguyen, C. ; Siddiqi, A. E. ; Cho, S. ; Saeed, A. M. / The role of exposures to animals and other risk factors in sporadic, non-typhoidal Salmonella infections in Michigan children. In: Zoonoses and Public Health. 2010 ; Vol. 57, No. 7-8.
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