The Relationship Between Social Support and Intimate Partner Violence in Neighborhood Context

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Social support has been recognized as a protective factor associated with reduced intimate partner violence (IPV). A question that few studies have examined, however, is whether the effectiveness of social support on IPV is conditioned by the neighborhood in which it occurs. This study investigated whether the separate effects of support from friends and family members on partner violence were conditioned by neighborhood disadvantage. Results indicated that social support from family significantly reduced the prevalence and frequency of IPV, whereas support from friends was associated with higher frequencies of partner violence. Importantly, the effects of social support were contextualized by neighborhood disadvantage, with the impact of both forms of social support on IPV being diminished in neighborhoods characterized by higher levels of disadvantage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1333-1359
Number of pages27
JournalCrime and Delinquency
Volume61
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

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Social Support
social support
violence
Violence
family member
Intimate Partner Violence

Keywords

  • domestic violence
  • intimate partner violence
  • neighborhood disadvantage
  • social disorganization theory
  • social isolation
  • social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

Cite this

The Relationship Between Social Support and Intimate Partner Violence in Neighborhood Context. / Steiner, Emily M.

In: Crime and Delinquency, Vol. 61, No. 10, 01.12.2015, p. 1333-1359.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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