The Relationship Between Social Anxiety and Alcohol and Marijuana Use Outcomes Among Concurrent Users: A Motivational Model of Substance Use

Protective Strategies Study Team

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: College students with more social anxiety symptoms are particularly vulnerable to problematic alcohol and marijuana use given their susceptibility for elevated anxiety symptoms in social settings combined with the normative nature of substance use. Existing research has established substance use as coping motivated for these students when examining alcohol and marijuana use problems separately. The next step is to determine whether students with more social anxiety who use both substances do so for similar or different reasons. The current study tested a comprehensive (i.e., all variables in the same model) motivational model of alcohol/marijuana use in a sample of college students from 10 universities across the United States who endorsed both past-month alcohol and marijuana use. Methods: College students were recruited through psychology department participant pools and completed an online survey assessing mental health symptoms, substance use motives, and substances use behaviors. Current sample comprised concurrent alcohol/marijuana users (n = 2,034), 29.6% of whom endorsed clinically indicated levels of social anxiety and nearly one-fourth exceeded the cutoff for hazardous drinking (23.2%) and hazardous marijuana use (21.9%). Results: Across both substances, coping motives significantly mediated the positive relationship between social anxiety symptoms and substance use problems. Unique to alcohol, conformity motives mediated the association between social anxiety symptoms and alcohol-related problems. Conclusions: Taken together, students with more social anxiety who are focused on anxiety management may use either alcohol or marijuana; however, these students may experience more alcohol-related problems when drinking to fit in with peers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)732-740
Number of pages9
JournalAlcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research
Volume43
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2019

Fingerprint

Cannabis
Anxiety
Alcohols
Students
Drinking
Mental Health
Health
Psychology
Research

Keywords

  • College Students
  • Drinking Problems
  • Marijuana Problems
  • Social Anxiety
  • Substance Use Motives

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The Relationship Between Social Anxiety and Alcohol and Marijuana Use Outcomes Among Concurrent Users : A Motivational Model of Substance Use. / Protective Strategies Study Team.

In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, Vol. 43, No. 4, 04.2019, p. 732-740.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{bbc9494962f44197bc3273ef8a071fca,
title = "The Relationship Between Social Anxiety and Alcohol and Marijuana Use Outcomes Among Concurrent Users: A Motivational Model of Substance Use",
abstract = "Background: College students with more social anxiety symptoms are particularly vulnerable to problematic alcohol and marijuana use given their susceptibility for elevated anxiety symptoms in social settings combined with the normative nature of substance use. Existing research has established substance use as coping motivated for these students when examining alcohol and marijuana use problems separately. The next step is to determine whether students with more social anxiety who use both substances do so for similar or different reasons. The current study tested a comprehensive (i.e., all variables in the same model) motivational model of alcohol/marijuana use in a sample of college students from 10 universities across the United States who endorsed both past-month alcohol and marijuana use. Methods: College students were recruited through psychology department participant pools and completed an online survey assessing mental health symptoms, substance use motives, and substances use behaviors. Current sample comprised concurrent alcohol/marijuana users (n = 2,034), 29.6{\%} of whom endorsed clinically indicated levels of social anxiety and nearly one-fourth exceeded the cutoff for hazardous drinking (23.2{\%}) and hazardous marijuana use (21.9{\%}). Results: Across both substances, coping motives significantly mediated the positive relationship between social anxiety symptoms and substance use problems. Unique to alcohol, conformity motives mediated the association between social anxiety symptoms and alcohol-related problems. Conclusions: Taken together, students with more social anxiety who are focused on anxiety management may use either alcohol or marijuana; however, these students may experience more alcohol-related problems when drinking to fit in with peers.",
keywords = "College Students, Drinking Problems, Marijuana Problems, Social Anxiety, Substance Use Motives",
author = "{Protective Strategies Study Team} and Villarosa-Hurlocker, {Margo C.} and Bravo, {Adrian J.} and Pearson, {Matthew R.} and Prince, {Mark A.} and Madson, {Michael B.} and Henson, {James M.} and Alison Looby and Gonzalez, {Vivian M.} and Henslee, {Amber M.} and Carrie Cuttler and Wong, {Maria M.} and McChargue, {Dennis E.}",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1111/acer.13966",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "43",
pages = "732--740",
journal = "Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research",
issn = "0145-6008",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Relationship Between Social Anxiety and Alcohol and Marijuana Use Outcomes Among Concurrent Users

T2 - A Motivational Model of Substance Use

AU - Protective Strategies Study Team

AU - Villarosa-Hurlocker, Margo C.

AU - Bravo, Adrian J.

AU - Pearson, Matthew R.

AU - Prince, Mark A.

AU - Madson, Michael B.

AU - Henson, James M.

AU - Looby, Alison

AU - Gonzalez, Vivian M.

AU - Henslee, Amber M.

AU - Cuttler, Carrie

AU - Wong, Maria M.

AU - McChargue, Dennis E.

PY - 2019/4

Y1 - 2019/4

N2 - Background: College students with more social anxiety symptoms are particularly vulnerable to problematic alcohol and marijuana use given their susceptibility for elevated anxiety symptoms in social settings combined with the normative nature of substance use. Existing research has established substance use as coping motivated for these students when examining alcohol and marijuana use problems separately. The next step is to determine whether students with more social anxiety who use both substances do so for similar or different reasons. The current study tested a comprehensive (i.e., all variables in the same model) motivational model of alcohol/marijuana use in a sample of college students from 10 universities across the United States who endorsed both past-month alcohol and marijuana use. Methods: College students were recruited through psychology department participant pools and completed an online survey assessing mental health symptoms, substance use motives, and substances use behaviors. Current sample comprised concurrent alcohol/marijuana users (n = 2,034), 29.6% of whom endorsed clinically indicated levels of social anxiety and nearly one-fourth exceeded the cutoff for hazardous drinking (23.2%) and hazardous marijuana use (21.9%). Results: Across both substances, coping motives significantly mediated the positive relationship between social anxiety symptoms and substance use problems. Unique to alcohol, conformity motives mediated the association between social anxiety symptoms and alcohol-related problems. Conclusions: Taken together, students with more social anxiety who are focused on anxiety management may use either alcohol or marijuana; however, these students may experience more alcohol-related problems when drinking to fit in with peers.

AB - Background: College students with more social anxiety symptoms are particularly vulnerable to problematic alcohol and marijuana use given their susceptibility for elevated anxiety symptoms in social settings combined with the normative nature of substance use. Existing research has established substance use as coping motivated for these students when examining alcohol and marijuana use problems separately. The next step is to determine whether students with more social anxiety who use both substances do so for similar or different reasons. The current study tested a comprehensive (i.e., all variables in the same model) motivational model of alcohol/marijuana use in a sample of college students from 10 universities across the United States who endorsed both past-month alcohol and marijuana use. Methods: College students were recruited through psychology department participant pools and completed an online survey assessing mental health symptoms, substance use motives, and substances use behaviors. Current sample comprised concurrent alcohol/marijuana users (n = 2,034), 29.6% of whom endorsed clinically indicated levels of social anxiety and nearly one-fourth exceeded the cutoff for hazardous drinking (23.2%) and hazardous marijuana use (21.9%). Results: Across both substances, coping motives significantly mediated the positive relationship between social anxiety symptoms and substance use problems. Unique to alcohol, conformity motives mediated the association between social anxiety symptoms and alcohol-related problems. Conclusions: Taken together, students with more social anxiety who are focused on anxiety management may use either alcohol or marijuana; however, these students may experience more alcohol-related problems when drinking to fit in with peers.

KW - College Students

KW - Drinking Problems

KW - Marijuana Problems

KW - Social Anxiety

KW - Substance Use Motives

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85062538454&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85062538454&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/acer.13966

DO - 10.1111/acer.13966

M3 - Article

C2 - 30830692

AN - SCOPUS:85062538454

VL - 43

SP - 732

EP - 740

JO - Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research

JF - Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research

SN - 0145-6008

IS - 4

ER -