The quality of post and cores made using a reduce-time casting technique

Paul A Hansen, M. LeBlanc, N. B. Cook, K. Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This study investigated the castability or casting completeness, surface roughness and dimensional accuracy of castings produced using a technique that requires as little as 24 minutes from the time of investment. Methods and Materials: A total of 225 gold castings (45 per group) were fabricated using two standard and three accelerated casting protocols. For each casting protocol, 15 castings were made from a rectangular, diamond-shaped mesh Duralay pattern to be used for castability evaluation; 15 castings were made from a flat, square pattern for measurement of surface roughness, and 15 castings were made from a tapered Duralay dowel to evaluate dimensional accuracy. Castings made with Fast Fire 15 and Ceramigold investment with shortened burnout times were compared to those made using Beauty Cast and Fast Fire 15 investment following the manufacturer's recommendations. Castability was evaluated by counting the number of diamonds cast in a rectangular mesh. A profilometer was used to measure surface roughness. To check dimensional accuracy, the casting was replaced in the original mold and a traveling microscope was used to measure the size difference at 32x magnification. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in castability and dimensional accuracy throughout all groups (p>.05). There was a statistically significant difference in the surface roughness of casts formed by Ceramigold compared to the other groups (p<.001). Conclusion: The short casting time using Fast Fire 15 can produce post and core castings that are of a quality acceptable for clinical use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)709-715
Number of pages7
JournalOperative dentistry
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2009

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Diamond
Beauty
Gold
Fungi
Duralay
ceramigold

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Hansen, P. A., LeBlanc, M., Cook, N. B., & Williams, K. (2009). The quality of post and cores made using a reduce-time casting technique. Operative dentistry, 34(6), 709-715. https://doi.org/10.2341/08-122-L

The quality of post and cores made using a reduce-time casting technique. / Hansen, Paul A; LeBlanc, M.; Cook, N. B.; Williams, K.

In: Operative dentistry, Vol. 34, No. 6, 01.11.2009, p. 709-715.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hansen, PA, LeBlanc, M, Cook, NB & Williams, K 2009, 'The quality of post and cores made using a reduce-time casting technique', Operative dentistry, vol. 34, no. 6, pp. 709-715. https://doi.org/10.2341/08-122-L
Hansen, Paul A ; LeBlanc, M. ; Cook, N. B. ; Williams, K. / The quality of post and cores made using a reduce-time casting technique. In: Operative dentistry. 2009 ; Vol. 34, No. 6. pp. 709-715.
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