The prioritisation of paediatrics and palliative care in cancer control plans in Africa

M. S. Weaver, A. J.J. Yao, L. A. Renner, M. Harif, C. G. Lam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Given the burden of childhood cancer and palliative care need in Africa, this paper investigated the paediatric and palliative care elements in cancer control plans. Methods: We conducted a comparative content analysis of accessible national cancer control plans in Africa, using a health systems perspective attentive to context, development, scope, and monitoring/evaluation. Burden estimates were derived from World Bank, World Health Organisation, and Worldwide Palliative Care Alliance. Results: Eighteen national plans and one Africa-wide plan (10 English, 9 French) were accessible, representing 9 low-, 4 lower-middle-, and 5 upper-middle-income settings. Ten plans discussed cancer control in the context of noncommunicable diseases. Paediatric cancer was mentioned in 7 national plans, representing 5127 children, or 13% of the estimated continental burden for children aged 0-14 years. Palliative care needs were recognised in 11 national plans, representing 157 490 children, or 24% of the estimated Africa-wide burden for children aged 0-14 years; four plans specified paediatric palliative needs. Palliative care was itemised in four budgets. Sample indicators and equity measures were identified, including those highlighting contextual needs for treatment access and completion. Conclusions: Recognising explicit strategies and funding for paediatric and palliative services may guide prioritised cancer control efforts in resource-limited settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1845-1856
Number of pages12
JournalBritish journal of cancer
Volume112
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 9 2015

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Keywords

  • cancer
  • health planning
  • health resources
  • paediatrics
  • palliative care
  • world health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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