The neurochemical consequences of methamphetamine self-administration in male and female rats

Andrew Johansen, Lisa McFadden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Methamphetamine (METH) is an addictive substance that is used in both males and females. Few preclinical studies have focused on understanding sex-differences in the neurochemical consequences of contingent METH. The purpose of the current study was to investigate potential sex-differences in the neurochemical consequences of METH self-administration. Methods Male and female adult rats were given extended access to METH or saline self-administration for 7 d. Following self-administration, hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) were assessed via western blotting. Results Male and female rats had similar METH intake. METH self-administration reduced striatal DAT in both sexes, but only males that self-administered METH had elevated hippocampal BDNF levels. Conclusions Sex-differences exist in the neurochemical consequences of METH self-administration. These differences may lead to sex-specific vulnerability to the toxic effects of METH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)70-74
Number of pages5
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume178
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Self Administration
Methamphetamine
Rats
Sex Characteristics
Corpus Striatum
Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor
Poisons
Western Blotting

Keywords

  • Brain-derived neurotrophic factor
  • Dopamine transporter
  • Female
  • Methamphetamine
  • Self-administration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

The neurochemical consequences of methamphetamine self-administration in male and female rats. / Johansen, Andrew; McFadden, Lisa.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 178, 01.09.2017, p. 70-74.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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