The microbial product lipopolysaccharide confers diabetogenic potential on the T cell repertoire of BDC2.5/NOD mice: Implications for the etiology of autoimmune diabetes

Balaji Balasa, Kurt Van Gunst, Nora Sarvetnick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Both genetic predisposition and environmental factors participate in the etiology of Type-1 diabetes. To test the role of the microbial product lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as an environmental trigger of autoimmune diabetes, we employed transgenic (tg) BDC2.5/NOD mice that bear an islet-specific CD4+ T cell repertoire (>95%), but do not develop the spontaneous diabetes that typifies the NOD (nonobese diabetic) strain. LPS administration provoked diabetes in BDC2.5/NOD mice by their 16th week of age. However, LPS administration in NOD mice did not accelerate their diabetes. This finding indicates that the frequency of islet-specific T cells influences LPS- mediated diabetes. Furthermore, in vitro LPS-cultured splenocytes from BDC2.5/NOD and BDC2.5-μMT (B-cell-deficient) mice effectively transferred diabetes into immunodeficient NOD-scid/scid mice but not immunosufficient NOD mice. Therefore, B. lymphocytes are not required for LPS-provoked autoimmune diabetes. Flow cytometric analysis then revealed that LPS-stimulation in vitro induced the expression of an IL-2 receptor (CD25) on CD4 T cells; this indicates that the activation of islet-specific T cells is a prerequisite to eliciting diabetes in this situation. Overall, these results point to microbial LPS as an etiopathogenic agent of autoimmune diabetes. (C) 2000 Academic Press.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-98
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Immunology
Volume95
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2000

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Inbred NOD Mouse
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Lipopolysaccharides
T-Lymphocytes
B-Lymphocytes
Interleukin-2 Receptors
Genetic Predisposition to Disease

Keywords

  • BDC2.5
  • Diabetes
  • Etiology
  • Infection
  • Lipopolysaccharide
  • NOD
  • Transgenic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

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abstract = "Both genetic predisposition and environmental factors participate in the etiology of Type-1 diabetes. To test the role of the microbial product lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as an environmental trigger of autoimmune diabetes, we employed transgenic (tg) BDC2.5/NOD mice that bear an islet-specific CD4+ T cell repertoire (>95{\%}), but do not develop the spontaneous diabetes that typifies the NOD (nonobese diabetic) strain. LPS administration provoked diabetes in BDC2.5/NOD mice by their 16th week of age. However, LPS administration in NOD mice did not accelerate their diabetes. This finding indicates that the frequency of islet-specific T cells influences LPS- mediated diabetes. Furthermore, in vitro LPS-cultured splenocytes from BDC2.5/NOD and BDC2.5-μMT (B-cell-deficient) mice effectively transferred diabetes into immunodeficient NOD-scid/scid mice but not immunosufficient NOD mice. Therefore, B. lymphocytes are not required for LPS-provoked autoimmune diabetes. Flow cytometric analysis then revealed that LPS-stimulation in vitro induced the expression of an IL-2 receptor (CD25) on CD4 T cells; this indicates that the activation of islet-specific T cells is a prerequisite to eliciting diabetes in this situation. Overall, these results point to microbial LPS as an etiopathogenic agent of autoimmune diabetes. (C) 2000 Academic Press.",
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