The mayo high performance teamwork scale

Reliability and validity for evaluating key crew resource management skills

James F. Malec, Laurence C. Torsher, William F. Dunn, Douglas A. Wiegmann, Jacqueline J. Arnold, Dwight A. Brown, Vaishali S Phatak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

137 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: To develop and evaluate a participant rating scale for assessing high performance teamwork skills in simulation medicine settings. METHODS: In all, 107 participants in crisis resource management (CRM) training in a multidisciplinary medical simulation center generated 273 ratings of key CRM skills after participating in two or three simulation exercises. These data were analyzed using Rasch and traditional psychometric approaches to develop the 16-item Mayo High Performance Teamwork Scale (MHPTS). Sensitivity to change as a result CRM training was also evaluated. RESULTS: The MHPTS showed satisfactory internal consistency and construct validity by Rasch (person reliability = 0.77; person separation = 1.85; item reliability = 0.96; item separation = 5.04) and traditional psychometric (Cronbach's alpha = 0.85) indicators. The scale demonstrated sensitivity to change as a result of CRM training (pretraining mean = 21.44 versus first posttraining rating mean = 24.37; paired t = -4.15, P < 0.0001; first posttraining mean = 24.63 versus second posttraining mean = 26.83; paired t = -4.31 P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: The MHPTS provides a brief, reliable, practical measure of CRM skills that can be used by participants in CRM training to reflect on and evaluate their performance as a team. Further evaluation of validity and appropriateness in other simulation and medical settings is desirable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4-10
Number of pages7
JournalSimulation in Healthcare
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2007

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Team Work
teamwork
Resource Management
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
High Performance
management
resources
performance
simulation
Medicine
psychometrics
Person
Simulation
rating
Construct Validity
Personnel rating
Internal Consistency
human being
Evaluate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Education
  • Modeling and Simulation

Cite this

The mayo high performance teamwork scale : Reliability and validity for evaluating key crew resource management skills. / Malec, James F.; Torsher, Laurence C.; Dunn, William F.; Wiegmann, Douglas A.; Arnold, Jacqueline J.; Brown, Dwight A.; Phatak, Vaishali S.

In: Simulation in Healthcare, Vol. 2, No. 1, 01.03.2007, p. 4-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Malec, James F. ; Torsher, Laurence C. ; Dunn, William F. ; Wiegmann, Douglas A. ; Arnold, Jacqueline J. ; Brown, Dwight A. ; Phatak, Vaishali S. / The mayo high performance teamwork scale : Reliability and validity for evaluating key crew resource management skills. In: Simulation in Healthcare. 2007 ; Vol. 2, No. 1. pp. 4-10.
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