The interdisciplinary generalist project at the University of Nebraska Medical Center

D. Steele, J. Susman, F. McCurdy, David Van O'Dell, Paul Mark Paulman, J. Stott

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Interdisciplinary Generalist Curriculum (IGC) Project at the University of Nebraska College of Medicine (Nebraska) had three goals: (1) to increase first- and second-year students' exposure to primary care practice in the community; (2) to develop specific educational programs introducing these students to the principles and practices of primary care medicine; and (3) to establish a generalist coordinating council to provide leadership and to nurture generalist educational initiatives in the College of Medicine. Students at Nebraska were already required to spend three half-days a semester in a longitudinal clinical experience (LCE) and to complete a three-week primary care block experience in the summer between the first and second years. IGC Project funds were used increase the number of required LCE visits to five a semester and to develop curricular enhancements that would maximize the educational potential of community-based clinical experiences for first- and second-year students. Curricular elements developed included a focus on faculty development for preceptors and development of the Primary Care Introduction to Medicine Curriculum, an eight-week, interdisciplinary module scheduled late in the first year to help prepare students for intensive summer rotations. Other developments were the implementation of a pediatric physical examination experience for firstyear students and the implementation of instruction in community-oriented primary care in the second year. Lessons learned are related to: (1) the value and power of early clinical experiences; and (2) the enhancing effect of a holistic, longitudinal view of the curriculum on the planning of early clinical experiences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume76
Issue number4 SUPPL.
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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Primary Health Care
Students
Curriculum
Medicine
interdisciplinary curriculum
medicine
experience
student
semester
community
curriculum
Financial Management
Physical Examination
educational program
Pediatrics
leadership
instruction
examination
planning
Values

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

The interdisciplinary generalist project at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. / Steele, D.; Susman, J.; McCurdy, F.; O'Dell, David Van; Paulman, Paul Mark; Stott, J.

In: Academic Medicine, Vol. 76, No. 4 SUPPL., 01.01.2001.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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