The Influence of Treatment Descriptions on Advance Medical Directive Decisions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether the wording of the descriptions of life‐sustaining interventions would affect the choices elderly patients make when completing advance directives. Methods: Survey. Setting: General community in Omaha, Nebraska. Patients: Two hundred one community‐dwelling elderly were selected from a population‐based sample. Main Outcome Measures: Subjects were asked whether they would accept or reject three life‐sustaining interventions: cardiopulmonary resuscitation, mechanical ventilation, or tube feeding in three separate hypothetical case scenarios. The three life‐sustaining interventions were each described positively, negatively, and exactly as they are worded in a widely used advance directive. Subjects reviewed each scenario three times with three different descriptions of the three interventions. Results: For the three interventions presented in three scenarios, subjects opted for the intervention 12 percent of the time when it was presented negatively, 18 percent of the time when it was phrased as in an advance directive already in use and 30 percent of the time it was phrased positively. One hundred fifty‐five of the 201 subjects (77 percent) changed their minds at least once when given the same scenario but a different description of the intervention. Of these 155, 33 percent changed decisions one to three times, 33 percent changed decisions four to seven times, and another 34 percent changed decisions eight to seventeen times based solely on the description of the intervention. Conclusion: The decisions patients make about whether to accept or reject life‐sustaining treatments are affected by the descriptions of the treatments. These findings emphasize the critical importance of doctor‐patient consultation when patients execute advance directives. J Am Geriatr Soc 40:1255–1260, 1992 1992 The American Geriatrics Society

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1255-1260
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume40
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

Fingerprint

Advance Directives
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Enteral Nutrition
Therapeutics
Artificial Respiration
Referral and Consultation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

@article{4f6ca83f759449feacfeeb738ec1a8e2,
title = "The Influence of Treatment Descriptions on Advance Medical Directive Decisions",
abstract = "Objective: To determine whether the wording of the descriptions of life‐sustaining interventions would affect the choices elderly patients make when completing advance directives. Methods: Survey. Setting: General community in Omaha, Nebraska. Patients: Two hundred one community‐dwelling elderly were selected from a population‐based sample. Main Outcome Measures: Subjects were asked whether they would accept or reject three life‐sustaining interventions: cardiopulmonary resuscitation, mechanical ventilation, or tube feeding in three separate hypothetical case scenarios. The three life‐sustaining interventions were each described positively, negatively, and exactly as they are worded in a widely used advance directive. Subjects reviewed each scenario three times with three different descriptions of the three interventions. Results: For the three interventions presented in three scenarios, subjects opted for the intervention 12 percent of the time when it was presented negatively, 18 percent of the time when it was phrased as in an advance directive already in use and 30 percent of the time it was phrased positively. One hundred fifty‐five of the 201 subjects (77 percent) changed their minds at least once when given the same scenario but a different description of the intervention. Of these 155, 33 percent changed decisions one to three times, 33 percent changed decisions four to seven times, and another 34 percent changed decisions eight to seventeen times based solely on the description of the intervention. Conclusion: The decisions patients make about whether to accept or reject life‐sustaining treatments are affected by the descriptions of the treatments. These findings emphasize the critical importance of doctor‐patient consultation when patients execute advance directives. J Am Geriatr Soc 40:1255–1260, 1992 1992 The American Geriatrics Society",
author = "Timothy Malloy and Wigton, {Robert Swift} and J. Meeske and Tape, {Thomas Gerald}",
year = "1992",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1532-5415.1992.tb03652.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "40",
pages = "1255--1260",
journal = "Journal of the American Geriatrics Society",
issn = "0002-8614",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Influence of Treatment Descriptions on Advance Medical Directive Decisions

AU - Malloy, Timothy

AU - Wigton, Robert Swift

AU - Meeske, J.

AU - Tape, Thomas Gerald

PY - 1992/1/1

Y1 - 1992/1/1

N2 - Objective: To determine whether the wording of the descriptions of life‐sustaining interventions would affect the choices elderly patients make when completing advance directives. Methods: Survey. Setting: General community in Omaha, Nebraska. Patients: Two hundred one community‐dwelling elderly were selected from a population‐based sample. Main Outcome Measures: Subjects were asked whether they would accept or reject three life‐sustaining interventions: cardiopulmonary resuscitation, mechanical ventilation, or tube feeding in three separate hypothetical case scenarios. The three life‐sustaining interventions were each described positively, negatively, and exactly as they are worded in a widely used advance directive. Subjects reviewed each scenario three times with three different descriptions of the three interventions. Results: For the three interventions presented in three scenarios, subjects opted for the intervention 12 percent of the time when it was presented negatively, 18 percent of the time when it was phrased as in an advance directive already in use and 30 percent of the time it was phrased positively. One hundred fifty‐five of the 201 subjects (77 percent) changed their minds at least once when given the same scenario but a different description of the intervention. Of these 155, 33 percent changed decisions one to three times, 33 percent changed decisions four to seven times, and another 34 percent changed decisions eight to seventeen times based solely on the description of the intervention. Conclusion: The decisions patients make about whether to accept or reject life‐sustaining treatments are affected by the descriptions of the treatments. These findings emphasize the critical importance of doctor‐patient consultation when patients execute advance directives. J Am Geriatr Soc 40:1255–1260, 1992 1992 The American Geriatrics Society

AB - Objective: To determine whether the wording of the descriptions of life‐sustaining interventions would affect the choices elderly patients make when completing advance directives. Methods: Survey. Setting: General community in Omaha, Nebraska. Patients: Two hundred one community‐dwelling elderly were selected from a population‐based sample. Main Outcome Measures: Subjects were asked whether they would accept or reject three life‐sustaining interventions: cardiopulmonary resuscitation, mechanical ventilation, or tube feeding in three separate hypothetical case scenarios. The three life‐sustaining interventions were each described positively, negatively, and exactly as they are worded in a widely used advance directive. Subjects reviewed each scenario three times with three different descriptions of the three interventions. Results: For the three interventions presented in three scenarios, subjects opted for the intervention 12 percent of the time when it was presented negatively, 18 percent of the time when it was phrased as in an advance directive already in use and 30 percent of the time it was phrased positively. One hundred fifty‐five of the 201 subjects (77 percent) changed their minds at least once when given the same scenario but a different description of the intervention. Of these 155, 33 percent changed decisions one to three times, 33 percent changed decisions four to seven times, and another 34 percent changed decisions eight to seventeen times based solely on the description of the intervention. Conclusion: The decisions patients make about whether to accept or reject life‐sustaining treatments are affected by the descriptions of the treatments. These findings emphasize the critical importance of doctor‐patient consultation when patients execute advance directives. J Am Geriatr Soc 40:1255–1260, 1992 1992 The American Geriatrics Society

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026460442&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026460442&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1532-5415.1992.tb03652.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1532-5415.1992.tb03652.x

M3 - Article

VL - 40

SP - 1255

EP - 1260

JO - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

JF - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

SN - 0002-8614

IS - 12

ER -