The influence of significant others on attitudes, subjective norms and intentions regarding dietary supplement use among adolescent athletes

Michael S. Dunn, James M. Eddy, Min Qi Wang, Steve Nagy, Michael A. Perko, R. Todd Bartee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Dietary supplement use has increased significantly over the past decade. The use of supplements among adolescents seems to be influenced by their beliefs and attitudes. The influence of coaches, parents, and athletic trainers also may be important. The purpose of this study was (1) to determine whether attitudes are a better predictor of adolescents' intentions to use dietary supplements than are subjective norms, and (2) to assess the influence of significant others (coaches, parents, and trainers) on attitudes, subjective norms, and intentions among adolescent athletes. Adolescents (N = 1,626) who were enrolled in grades six through twelve in nine public schools completed a self-report questionnaire that measured attitudes, subjective norms, and intentions regarding dietary supplement use. Results indicated that attitudes were a better predictor of intentions to use dietary supplements than were subjective norms. It was also found that trainers had more influence on the attitudes, subjective norms, and intentions of adolescents regarding supplement use than did parents and coaches. Implications for prevention are addressed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)583-591
Number of pages9
JournalAdolescence
Volume36
Issue number143
StatePublished - Sep 1 2001

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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