The influence of parental and communication style on consumer socialization: A meta-analysis informs marketing strategy considerations involving parent-child interventions

Jessica Mikeska, Robert L. Harrison, Les Carlson, Chris L.S. Coryn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This meta-analysis merged family communication pattern (FCP) and parental socialization literature streams to offer renewed perspectives on how parents intervene in mediarelated consumer-socialization interactions with children. With only one exception, FCPtype effects were not different from theorized corresponding parental socialization-style effect sizes. This supports prior literature suggesting equivalency between specific FCP and parental socialization pairs. Furthermore, when certain FCP-parental socialization pairs were compared with other pairs on socialization interactions, such as control, coviewing, and discussing media strategy, differences were found that prior theorizing would have supported. Implications of these results are discussed, including what they suggest for managers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-334
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Advertising Research
Volume57
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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socialization
Marketing
parents
marketing
communication pattern
communication
Communication
Managers
interaction
Consumer socialization
Socialization
Marketing strategy
Communication style
Meta-analysis
manager
Interaction
literature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Marketing

Cite this

The influence of parental and communication style on consumer socialization : A meta-analysis informs marketing strategy considerations involving parent-child interventions. / Mikeska, Jessica; Harrison, Robert L.; Carlson, Les; Coryn, Chris L.S.

In: Journal of Advertising Research, Vol. 57, No. 3, 01.01.2017, p. 319-334.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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