The influence of gender role stereotypes, the woman's race, and level of provocation and resistance on domestic violence culpability attributions

Cynthia Willis-Esqueda, Lisa A. Harrison

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The influence of traditional or egalitarian gender role stereotypes on perceptions of domestic violence was investigated when the woman's race and her provocation of and resistance to domestic violence were varied. Two hundred eighty-eight European American participants who varied in their gender role stereotype beliefs provided culpability ratings. A factor analysis reduced culpability items to six concepts. Biases against the African American woman occurred, but not to the European American woman, particularly when she provoked the man. The woman's behavior before and after violence influenced participants' culpability notions, and beliefs in gender role stereotypes influenced perceptions of truthfulness based on race. Implications for the scope of educational programs to enhance support and eliminate biases are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)821-834
Number of pages14
JournalSex Roles
Volume53
Issue number11-12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005

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provocation
Domestic Violence
domestic violence
gender role
attribution
stereotype
trend
Violence
educational program
African Americans
Statistical Factor Analysis
factor analysis
rating
violence

Keywords

  • African American women
  • Domestic violence
  • Gender role beliefs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

The influence of gender role stereotypes, the woman's race, and level of provocation and resistance on domestic violence culpability attributions. / Willis-Esqueda, Cynthia; Harrison, Lisa A.

In: Sex Roles, Vol. 53, No. 11-12, 01.12.2005, p. 821-834.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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