The impact of virtual dissection on engineering student learning and self-efficacy

Christine A. Toh, Connor S. Disco, Scarlett R. Miller

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Product dissection activities are widely practiced in engineering education as a means of increasing student learning and understanding of core engineering concepts. While recent efforts in this area of research have sought to develop and utilize virtual dissection tools in order to reduce and mitigate the costs of physical dissection activities, little data exists on how virtual dissection impacts student learning and understanding. This lack of data makes it difficult to draw conclusions on the utility of virtual dissection tools for enhancing engineering instruction. In this paper we present the results of a controlled experiment conducted with first-year engineering students developed to examine the impact of virtual dissection on engineering student learning and selfefficacy. Our results revealed that student learning appeared to be unaffected through the use of virtual dissection environments. However, electro-mechanical self-efficacy gains were smaller for students who performed virtual dissection compared to students who performed physical dissection. These results add to our knowledge of the impact that virtual dissection tools can have on student learning and understanding and enable us to develop recommendations and guidelines for improving the effectiveness of these tools in engineering education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication16th International Conference on Advanced Vehicle Technologies; 11th International Conference on Design Education; 7th Frontiers in Biomedical Devices
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
ISBN (Electronic)9780791846346
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
EventASME 2014 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2014 - Buffalo, United States
Duration: Aug 17 2014Aug 20 2014

Publication series

NameProceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference
Volume3

Other

OtherASME 2014 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2014
CountryUnited States
CityBuffalo
Period8/17/148/20/14

Fingerprint

Self-efficacy
Dissection
Student Learning
Students
Engineering
Engineering Education
Engineering education
Recommendations

Keywords

  • Engineering education
  • Learning
  • Self-efficacy
  • Virtual dissection
  • Virtual learning environment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

Cite this

Toh, C. A., Disco, C. S., & Miller, S. R. (2014). The impact of virtual dissection on engineering student learning and self-efficacy. In 16th International Conference on Advanced Vehicle Technologies; 11th International Conference on Design Education; 7th Frontiers in Biomedical Devices (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference; Vol. 3). American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2014-35196

The impact of virtual dissection on engineering student learning and self-efficacy. / Toh, Christine A.; Disco, Connor S.; Miller, Scarlett R.

16th International Conference on Advanced Vehicle Technologies; 11th International Conference on Design Education; 7th Frontiers in Biomedical Devices. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2014. (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference; Vol. 3).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Toh, CA, Disco, CS & Miller, SR 2014, The impact of virtual dissection on engineering student learning and self-efficacy. in 16th International Conference on Advanced Vehicle Technologies; 11th International Conference on Design Education; 7th Frontiers in Biomedical Devices. Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference, vol. 3, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), ASME 2014 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2014, Buffalo, United States, 8/17/14. https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2014-35196
Toh CA, Disco CS, Miller SR. The impact of virtual dissection on engineering student learning and self-efficacy. In 16th International Conference on Advanced Vehicle Technologies; 11th International Conference on Design Education; 7th Frontiers in Biomedical Devices. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). 2014. (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2014-35196
Toh, Christine A. ; Disco, Connor S. ; Miller, Scarlett R. / The impact of virtual dissection on engineering student learning and self-efficacy. 16th International Conference on Advanced Vehicle Technologies; 11th International Conference on Design Education; 7th Frontiers in Biomedical Devices. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2014. (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference).
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