The impact of stimulus diversity on creative solution generation: An evaluation of the cognitive network model of creativity

E. L. Santanen, R. O. Briggs, G. J. De Vreede

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Creativity is essential to an organization's survival. In order to remain productive and adaptive, an organization's members must devise creative solutions - solutions that work, and that fall outside the set of known solutions. The cognitive network model (CNM) of creativity proposes a cognitive explanation of the mechanisms that cause creative solutions to occur in the human mind. This paper reports the results of an experimental test of CNM. Sixty-one four-person groups used either the FreeBrainstorming thinkLet or the DirectedBrainstorming thinkLet to generate solutions for one of two ill-structured tasks. In FreeBrainstorming, participants generate creative solutions without intervention from a moderator. In DirectedBrainstorming, a moderator presents a series of oral prompts at fixed intervals to stimulate new lines of thinking. To gain more insight into the mechanisms underlying creativity, we tested three levels of variety among the moderator's prompts. In both tasks, people using DirectedBrainstorming produced solutions with higher average creativity ratings, and higher concentrations of creative solutions than did people using FreeBrainstorming. Significant differences were also found among the three levels of variety used for DirectedBrainstorming.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 36th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2003
EditorsRalph H. Sprague
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
ISBN (Electronic)0769518745, 9780769518749
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003
Event36th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2003 - Big Island, United States
Duration: Jan 6 2003Jan 9 2003

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 36th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2003

Other

Other36th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2003
CountryUnited States
CityBig Island
Period1/6/031/9/03

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Moderators

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Information Systems
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Santanen, E. L., Briggs, R. O., & De Vreede, G. J. (2003). The impact of stimulus diversity on creative solution generation: An evaluation of the cognitive network model of creativity. In R. H. Sprague (Ed.), Proceedings of the 36th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2003 [1174598] (Proceedings of the 36th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2003). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2003.1174598

The impact of stimulus diversity on creative solution generation : An evaluation of the cognitive network model of creativity. / Santanen, E. L.; Briggs, R. O.; De Vreede, G. J.

Proceedings of the 36th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2003. ed. / Ralph H. Sprague. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2003. 1174598 (Proceedings of the 36th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2003).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Santanen, EL, Briggs, RO & De Vreede, GJ 2003, The impact of stimulus diversity on creative solution generation: An evaluation of the cognitive network model of creativity. in RH Sprague (ed.), Proceedings of the 36th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2003., 1174598, Proceedings of the 36th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2003, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 36th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2003, Big Island, United States, 1/6/03. https://doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2003.1174598
Santanen EL, Briggs RO, De Vreede GJ. The impact of stimulus diversity on creative solution generation: An evaluation of the cognitive network model of creativity. In Sprague RH, editor, Proceedings of the 36th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2003. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2003. 1174598. (Proceedings of the 36th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2003). https://doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2003.1174598
Santanen, E. L. ; Briggs, R. O. ; De Vreede, G. J. / The impact of stimulus diversity on creative solution generation : An evaluation of the cognitive network model of creativity. Proceedings of the 36th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2003. editor / Ralph H. Sprague. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2003. (Proceedings of the 36th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2003).
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