The exploitation of differential endocytic pathways in normal and tumor cells in the selective targeting of nanoparticulate chemotherapeutic agents

Gaurav Sahay, Jong Oh Kim, Alexander V. Kabanov, Tatiana K Bronich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

107 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Polymeric micelles with cross-linked ionic cores of poly(methacrylic acid) and nonionic shell of poly(ethylene oxide) (cl-micelles) are shown here to readily internalize in epithelial cancer cells but not in normal epithelial cells that form tight junctions (TJ). The internalization of such cl-micelles in the cancer cells proceeded mainly through caveolae-mediated endocytosis. In confluent normal epithelial cells this endocytosis route was absent at the apical side and the cl-micelles sequestered in TJ regions of the cell membrane without entering the cells for at least 24 h. Disruption of the TJ by calcium deprivation resulted in redistribution of cl-micelles inside the cells. In cancer cells following initial cellular entry the cl-micelles bypassed the early endosomes and reached the lysosomes within 30 min. This allowed designing cl-micelles with cytotoxic drug, doxorubicin, linked via pH-sensitive hydrazone bonds, which were cleaved in the acidic environment of lysosomes resulting in accumulation of the drug in the nucleus after 5 h. Such pH-sensitive cl-micelles displayed selective toxicity to cancer cells but were non-toxic to normal epithelial cells. In conclusion, we describe major difference in interactions of cl-micelles with cancer and normal cells that can lead to development of novel drug delivery system with reduced side effects and higher efficacy in cancer chemotherapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)923-933
Number of pages11
JournalBiomaterials
Volume31
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2010

Fingerprint

Micelles
Tumors
Cells
Neoplasms
Tight Junctions
Epithelial Cells
Endocytosis
Lysosomes
Caveolae
Hydrazones
Ethylene Oxide
Chemotherapy
Endosomes
Cell membranes
Drug Delivery Systems
Polyethylene oxides
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Doxorubicin
Toxicity
Calcium

Keywords

  • Caveolae
  • Drug delivery
  • Endocytosis
  • Nanomaterials
  • Nanoparticles
  • Nanoparticulate materials
  • Tight junctions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Biophysics
  • Biomaterials
  • Mechanics of Materials

Cite this

The exploitation of differential endocytic pathways in normal and tumor cells in the selective targeting of nanoparticulate chemotherapeutic agents. / Sahay, Gaurav; Kim, Jong Oh; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Bronich, Tatiana K.

In: Biomaterials, Vol. 31, No. 5, 01.02.2010, p. 923-933.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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