The effects of type and level of personal involvement on information search and problem solving

Jody J. Illies, Roni Reiter-Palmon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effects of type and level of personal involvement on information search and problem solving were investigated in a laboratory setting. Participants were given a problem eliciting high value involvement, high outcome involvement, or low involvement. Before providing a solution to the problem, participants had the opportunity to search for additional information about the problem using a computer. The amount of information searched and the time spent searching were measured, as was the quality of problem solutions. Results showed that increases in information search resulted in more original and more appropriate problem solutions. Results also revealed that solution originality and appropriateness were highest among participants who were involved because the problem's outcome was relevant to them and lowest among participants who were involved because the problem affected their values and morals. The results of this study indicate that high involvement may not be universally beneficial to the generation of high-quality problem solutions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1709-1729
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume34
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2004

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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