The effects of noncontingent and contingent attention for self-injury, manding, and collateral responses

K. Mark Derby, Wayne W. Fisher, Cathleen C. Piazza, Arthur E. Wilke, Whttney Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To date, most functional analysis studies have focused on the effects of treatment contingencies on specific targeted aberrant and alternative responses. In the current investigation, the main and collateral effects of the assessment and treatment of attention-maintained self-injury were assessed. Specifically, we evaluated the effects of noncontingent and contingent social attention on four categories of behavior: self-injury, a novel mand, preexisting prosocial responses (e.g., babbling and reaching out), and other aberrant responses (i.e., aggression and destruction). Results suggested that self-injury, prosocial responses, and other aberrant behaviors were within the same functional response class. Possible impact of these results when selecting mands for functional communication training is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)474-484
Number of pages11
JournalBehavior Modification
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1998

Fingerprint

Wounds and Injuries
Aggression
Communication
Therapeutics
Contingent
Self-injury
Communication Training
Functional Communication
Functional Analysis
Babbling
Destruction
Contingency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The effects of noncontingent and contingent attention for self-injury, manding, and collateral responses. / Derby, K. Mark; Fisher, Wayne W.; Piazza, Cathleen C.; Wilke, Arthur E.; Johnson, Whttney.

In: Behavior Modification, Vol. 22, No. 4, 01.10.1998, p. 474-484.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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