The effects of four weeks of creatine supplementation and high-intensity interval training on cardiorespiratory fitness

A randomized controlled trial

Jennifer L. Graef, Abbie E. Smith, Kristina L. Kendall, David H. Fukuda, Jordan R. Moon, Travis W. Beck, Joel T Cramer, Jeffrey R. Stout

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: High-intensity interval training has been shown to be a time-efficient way to induce physiological adaptations similar to those of traditional endurance training. Creatine supplementation may enhance high-intensity interval training, leading to even greater physiological adaptations. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and creatine supplementation on cardiorespiratory fitness and endurance performance (maximal oxygen consumption (VO2PEAK), time-to-exhaustion (VO2PEAKTTE), ventilatory threshold (VT), and total work done (TWD)) in college-aged men. Methods: Forty-three recreationally active men completed a graded exercise test to determine VO2PEAK, VO2PEAKTTE, and VT. In addition, participants completed a time to exhaustion (TTE) ride at 110% of the maximum workload reached during the graded exercise test to determine TWD (TTE (sec) × W = J). Following testing, participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups: creatine (creatine citrate) (Cr; n = 16), placebo (PL; n = 17), or control (n = 10) groups. The Cr and PL groups completed four weeks of HIIT prior to post-testing. Results: Significant improvements in VO2PEAK and VO2PEAKTTE occurred in both training groups. Only the Cr group significantly improved VT (16% vs. 10% improvement in PL). No changes occurred in TWD in any group. Conclusion: In conclusion, HIIT is an effective and time-efficient way to improve maximal endurance performance. The addition of Cr improved VT, but did not increase TWD. Therefore, 10 g of Cr per day for five days per week for four weeks does not seem to further augment maximal oxygen consumption, greater than HIIT alone; however, Cr supplementation may improve submaximal exercise performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number18
JournalJournal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
Volume6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 12 2009

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creatine
Creatine
Randomized Controlled Trials
exercise test
oxygen consumption
Physiological Adaptation
Exercise Test
Oxygen Consumption
citrates
placebos
exercise
testing
Cardiorespiratory Fitness
High-Intensity Interval Training
Workload
Citric Acid
Placebos
Exercise
methodology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

The effects of four weeks of creatine supplementation and high-intensity interval training on cardiorespiratory fitness : A randomized controlled trial. / Graef, Jennifer L.; Smith, Abbie E.; Kendall, Kristina L.; Fukuda, David H.; Moon, Jordan R.; Beck, Travis W.; Cramer, Joel T; Stout, Jeffrey R.

In: Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, Vol. 6, 18, 12.11.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Graef, Jennifer L. ; Smith, Abbie E. ; Kendall, Kristina L. ; Fukuda, David H. ; Moon, Jordan R. ; Beck, Travis W. ; Cramer, Joel T ; Stout, Jeffrey R. / The effects of four weeks of creatine supplementation and high-intensity interval training on cardiorespiratory fitness : A randomized controlled trial. In: Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. 2009 ; Vol. 6.
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abstract = "Background: High-intensity interval training has been shown to be a time-efficient way to induce physiological adaptations similar to those of traditional endurance training. Creatine supplementation may enhance high-intensity interval training, leading to even greater physiological adaptations. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and creatine supplementation on cardiorespiratory fitness and endurance performance (maximal oxygen consumption (VO2PEAK), time-to-exhaustion (VO2PEAKTTE), ventilatory threshold (VT), and total work done (TWD)) in college-aged men. Methods: Forty-three recreationally active men completed a graded exercise test to determine VO2PEAK, VO2PEAKTTE, and VT. In addition, participants completed a time to exhaustion (TTE) ride at 110{\%} of the maximum workload reached during the graded exercise test to determine TWD (TTE (sec) × W = J). Following testing, participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups: creatine (creatine citrate) (Cr; n = 16), placebo (PL; n = 17), or control (n = 10) groups. The Cr and PL groups completed four weeks of HIIT prior to post-testing. Results: Significant improvements in VO2PEAK and VO2PEAKTTE occurred in both training groups. Only the Cr group significantly improved VT (16{\%} vs. 10{\%} improvement in PL). No changes occurred in TWD in any group. Conclusion: In conclusion, HIIT is an effective and time-efficient way to improve maximal endurance performance. The addition of Cr improved VT, but did not increase TWD. Therefore, 10 g of Cr per day for five days per week for four weeks does not seem to further augment maximal oxygen consumption, greater than HIIT alone; however, Cr supplementation may improve submaximal exercise performance.",
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AU - Graef, Jennifer L.

AU - Smith, Abbie E.

AU - Kendall, Kristina L.

AU - Fukuda, David H.

AU - Moon, Jordan R.

AU - Beck, Travis W.

AU - Cramer, Joel T

AU - Stout, Jeffrey R.

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AB - Background: High-intensity interval training has been shown to be a time-efficient way to induce physiological adaptations similar to those of traditional endurance training. Creatine supplementation may enhance high-intensity interval training, leading to even greater physiological adaptations. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and creatine supplementation on cardiorespiratory fitness and endurance performance (maximal oxygen consumption (VO2PEAK), time-to-exhaustion (VO2PEAKTTE), ventilatory threshold (VT), and total work done (TWD)) in college-aged men. Methods: Forty-three recreationally active men completed a graded exercise test to determine VO2PEAK, VO2PEAKTTE, and VT. In addition, participants completed a time to exhaustion (TTE) ride at 110% of the maximum workload reached during the graded exercise test to determine TWD (TTE (sec) × W = J). Following testing, participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups: creatine (creatine citrate) (Cr; n = 16), placebo (PL; n = 17), or control (n = 10) groups. The Cr and PL groups completed four weeks of HIIT prior to post-testing. Results: Significant improvements in VO2PEAK and VO2PEAKTTE occurred in both training groups. Only the Cr group significantly improved VT (16% vs. 10% improvement in PL). No changes occurred in TWD in any group. Conclusion: In conclusion, HIIT is an effective and time-efficient way to improve maximal endurance performance. The addition of Cr improved VT, but did not increase TWD. Therefore, 10 g of Cr per day for five days per week for four weeks does not seem to further augment maximal oxygen consumption, greater than HIIT alone; however, Cr supplementation may improve submaximal exercise performance.

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