The effects of a plyometric training program on the latency time of the quadriceps femoris and gastrocnemius short-latency responses

D. H. Potach, D. Katsavelis, Gregory M Karst, R. W. Latin, Nicholas Stergiou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim. The purpose of this study was to determine if a plyome-tric training program can affect the latency time of the qua-driceps femoris and gastrocnemius short-latency responses (SLRs) of the stretch reflex. Methods. Sixteen healthy subjects (12 female and 4 male) were randomly assigned to either a control or a plyometric training group. Maximum vertical jump height (VJ) and SLRs of both quadriceps femoris and gastrocnemius were measured before and after a four week plyometric training program. Results. Plyometric training significantly increased VJ (mean±SEM) by 2.38±0.45 cm (P<0.05) and non-significantly decreased the latency time of the quadriceps femoris SLR (mean±SEM) 0363±0.404 ms (P>0.05) and gastrocnemius SLR (mean±SEM) 0.392±0.257 ms (P>0.05). VJ results support the effectiveness of plyometric training for increasing VJ height. Conclusion. The non-significant changes in the latency time of the quadriceps femoris and gastrocnemius SLRs seen in the trai-ning group suggest that performance improvements following a four-week plyometric training program are not mediated by changes in the latency time of the short-latency stretch reflex.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-43
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness
Volume49
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 1 2009

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Plyometric Exercise
Quadriceps Muscle
Reaction Time
Education
Stretch Reflex
Healthy Volunteers

Keywords

  • Electromyography
  • Muscle, skeletal
  • Reflex, stretch

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

The effects of a plyometric training program on the latency time of the quadriceps femoris and gastrocnemius short-latency responses. / Potach, D. H.; Katsavelis, D.; Karst, Gregory M; Latin, R. W.; Stergiou, Nicholas.

In: Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, Vol. 49, No. 1, 01.03.2009, p. 35-43.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Stergiou, Nicholas

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