The effects of 4 weeks of an arginine-based supplement on the gas exchange threshold and peak oxygen uptake

Clayton L. Camic, Terry J. Housh, Michelle Mielke, Jorge M. Zuniga, C. Russell Hendrix, Glen O. Johnson, Richard J. Schmidt, Dona J. Housh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of the daily administration of an arginine-based supplement for 4 weeks on the gas exchange threshold (GET) and peak oxygen uptake. The study used a double-blind, placebo-controlled design. Forty-one college-aged males (mean age ± SD = 22.1 ± 2.4 years) were randomized into either the PLACEBO (n = 20) or ARGININE (n = 21) group. The placebo was microcrystalline cellulose. The ARGININE group ingested 3.0 g of arginine, 300 mg of grape seed extract, and 300 mg of polyethylene glycol. All subjects performed an incremental test to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer prior to supplementation (PRE) and after 4 weeks of supplementation (POST). The GET was determined by using the V-slope method of the carbon dioxide output vs. oxygen uptake relationship. The results indicated that there were significant mean increases (PRE to POST) in GET (4.1%), as well as in carbon dioxide output (4.3%) and power output (5.4%) at the GET for the ARGININE group, but no significant changes for the PLACEBO group (2.5%, 4.3%, and 3.9%, respectively). In addition, there were no significant changes in peak oxygen uptake for the ARGININE (-1.0%) or PLACEBO (-1.5%) groups. These findings supported the use of the arginine-based supplement for increasing GET and the associated power output, but not for increasing peak oxygen uptake during cycle ergometry.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)286-293
Number of pages8
JournalApplied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 9 2010

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Arginine
Gases
Oxygen
Carbon Dioxide
Grape Seed Extract
Placebos
Ergometry

Keywords

  • Aerobic capacity
  • Anaerobic threshold
  • Grape seed extract
  • Supplementation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

The effects of 4 weeks of an arginine-based supplement on the gas exchange threshold and peak oxygen uptake. / Camic, Clayton L.; Housh, Terry J.; Mielke, Michelle; Zuniga, Jorge M.; Hendrix, C. Russell; Johnson, Glen O.; Schmidt, Richard J.; Housh, Dona J.

In: Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, Vol. 35, No. 3, 09.08.2010, p. 286-293.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Camic, Clayton L. ; Housh, Terry J. ; Mielke, Michelle ; Zuniga, Jorge M. ; Hendrix, C. Russell ; Johnson, Glen O. ; Schmidt, Richard J. ; Housh, Dona J. / The effects of 4 weeks of an arginine-based supplement on the gas exchange threshold and peak oxygen uptake. In: Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism. 2010 ; Vol. 35, No. 3. pp. 286-293.
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