The effectiveness of e-learning in pediatric medical student education

Rima N Khasawneh, Kari A Simonsen, Jessica Snowden, Joy Higgins, Gary Beck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Electronic learning allows individualized education and may improve student performance. This study assessed the impact of e-modules about infection control and congenital infections on medical knowledge. Methods: A descriptive study was conducted involving third-year medical students on pediatric clerkship. e-Module content in three different formats was developed: a text monograph, a PowerPoint presentation, and a narrated PowerPoint lecture. Students' use of the e-modules was tracked, as was participation in the infectious disease rotation and the order of pediatric rotation. Pre- and posttests specific to the e-module content and National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) pediatric exam scores were recorded. Results: Among 67 participants, 63% of them visited at least one e-module. Neither accessing any e-modules, timing of pediatric clerkship, nor assignment to ID rotation resulted in improved posttest nor NBME scores. Seventy percent of students rated the e-modules as satisfactory and reported usage improved their confidence with the congenital infections topic. Discussion: e-Modules did not improve student performance on NBME or posttest; however, they were perceived as satisfactory and to have improved confidence among those who used them. This study underscores the importance of formally evaluating electronic and other innovative curricula when implemented within existing medical education frameworks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number29516
JournalMedical Education Online
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Medical Education
Medical Students
Coroners and Medical Examiners
electronic learning
medical examiner
medical student
Learning
Pediatrics
Students
education
student
confidence
Infection Control
Infection
Curriculum
performance
contagious disease
Communicable Diseases
electronics
Education

Keywords

  • E-Learning
  • Medical education
  • Medical students
  • Pediatrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

The effectiveness of e-learning in pediatric medical student education. / Khasawneh, Rima N; Simonsen, Kari A; Snowden, Jessica; Higgins, Joy; Beck, Gary.

In: Medical Education Online, Vol. 21, No. 1, 29516, 01.01.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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