The effect of increased intracranial pressure on vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in superior canal dehiscence syndrome

Kristen L Janky, M. Geraldine Zuniga, Michael C. Schubert, John P. Carey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine if vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) responses change during inversion in patients with superior canal dehiscence syndrome (SCDS) compared to controls. Methods: Sixteen subjects with SCDS (mean: 43, range 30-57. years) and 15 age-matched, healthy subjects (mean: 41, range 22-57. years) completed cervical VEMP (cVEMP) in response to air conduction click stimuli and ocular VEMP (oVEMP) in response to air conduction 500. Hz tone burst stimuli and midline tap stimulation. All VEMP testing was completed in semi-recumbent and inverted conditions. Results: SCDS ears demonstrated significantly larger oVEMP peak-to-peak amplitudes in comparison to normal ears in semi-recumbency. While corrected cVEMP peak-to-peak amplitudes were larger in SCDS ears; this did not reach significance in our sample. Overall, there was not a differential change in o- or cVEMP amplitude with inversion between SCDS and normal subjects. Conclusions: Postural-induced changes in o- and cVEMP responses were measured in the steady state regardless of whether the labyrinth was intact or dehiscent. Significance: VEMP responses are blunted during inversion. Although steady-state measurements of VEMPs during inversion do not increase diagnostic accuracy for SCDS, the findings suggest that inversion may provide more general insights into the equilibration of pressures between intracranial and intralabyrinthine fluids.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)780-786
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Neurophysiology
Volume126
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

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Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials
Intracranial Pressure
Ear
Air
Inner Ear
Healthy Volunteers

Keywords

  • Intracranial pressure
  • Superior canal dehiscence
  • Vestibular evoked myogenic potential

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sensory Systems
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

The effect of increased intracranial pressure on vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in superior canal dehiscence syndrome. / Janky, Kristen L; Zuniga, M. Geraldine; Schubert, Michael C.; Carey, John P.

In: Clinical Neurophysiology, Vol. 126, No. 4, 01.04.2015, p. 780-786.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Janky, Kristen L ; Zuniga, M. Geraldine ; Schubert, Michael C. ; Carey, John P. / The effect of increased intracranial pressure on vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in superior canal dehiscence syndrome. In: Clinical Neurophysiology. 2015 ; Vol. 126, No. 4. pp. 780-786.
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