The ecological niche of echinococcus multilocularis in north America

Understanding biotic and abiotic determinants of parasite distribution with new records in New Mexico and maryland, United States

Sebastian Botero-Cañola, Altangerel T. Dursahinhan, Sara E. Rácz, Parker V. Lowe, John E. Ubelaker, Scott L Gardner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding the factors shaping the niche of parasites and its expression over geographical space and through time continues to be a modern scientific challenge with the results of research in this area directly influencing both theoretical and applied biology. This is especially important for proactive management of zoonotic parasites such as Echinococcus multilocularis, the etiologic agent of alveolar echinococcosis. Echinococcus multilocularis has a Holarctic distribution; with its geographic range and prevalence increasing recently in areas of the western Palearctic, while its distribution dynamics are poorly understood in the Nearctic. In this paper, we use an ecological niche modeling (ENM) approach to: i) estimate the current spatial distribution of suitable conditions for the parasite in the Nearctic. ii) Evaluate the abiotic and biotic factors influencing the species distribution. iii) Assess the potential impact of climatic change on the distribution of this species in the Nearctic. Additionally, we report two new occurrence records of this parasite that significantly expands its known geographic range. We reviewed the occurrence records of E. multilocularis for the Nearctic. This was complemented by two new records of the species from Maryland and New Mexico identified using morphology and multivariate morphometrics of the rostellar hooks. From these data we created two ENMs using the software Maxent. The first ENM included climatic variables, while the second included the same abiotic data plus biotic information consisting of four host community-related data sets. We evaluated model performance and variable importance to explore the relation of these variables to the parasite niche. Finally, we projected the resulting niche model onto future climate change scenarios. We found that an important portion of the Nearctic has suitable conditions for E. multilocularis with adequate habitat in the West and East of the continent where the parasite has not been detected. We also found that the proposed biotic variables improve the model performance and provide unique information, while the most critical abiotic variable was related to the amount of solar radiation. Finally, under the future emission scenarios explored, the distribution of suitable habitat for the parasite is predicted to increase by 56 % to 76 %. We obtained a robust model that provides detail on the distribution of suitable areas for E. multilocularis, including areas that have not been explored for the presence of the parasite. The host community variables included in this study seem a promising way to include biotic data for ecological parasite niche modeling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-102
Number of pages12
JournalTherya
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Echinococcus multilocularis
niches
parasites
biogeography
climate change
echinococcosis
habitats
space and time
solar radiation
spatial distribution
Biological Sciences
environmental factors

Keywords

  • Carnivora
  • Disease geography
  • Echinococcosis
  • Echinococcus multilocularis
  • Ecological niche model
  • Maxent
  • Multivariate statistics
  • Nearctic
  • Parasite
  • Rodentia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

The ecological niche of echinococcus multilocularis in north America : Understanding biotic and abiotic determinants of parasite distribution with new records in New Mexico and maryland, United States. / Botero-Cañola, Sebastian; Dursahinhan, Altangerel T.; Rácz, Sara E.; Lowe, Parker V.; Ubelaker, John E.; Gardner, Scott L.

In: Therya, Vol. 10, No. 2, 01.01.2019, p. 91-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Botero-Cañola, Sebastian ; Dursahinhan, Altangerel T. ; Rácz, Sara E. ; Lowe, Parker V. ; Ubelaker, John E. ; Gardner, Scott L. / The ecological niche of echinococcus multilocularis in north America : Understanding biotic and abiotic determinants of parasite distribution with new records in New Mexico and maryland, United States. In: Therya. 2019 ; Vol. 10, No. 2. pp. 91-102.
@article{9616548832f54d6b9f3b6be078e27047,
title = "The ecological niche of echinococcus multilocularis in north America: Understanding biotic and abiotic determinants of parasite distribution with new records in New Mexico and maryland, United States",
abstract = "Understanding the factors shaping the niche of parasites and its expression over geographical space and through time continues to be a modern scientific challenge with the results of research in this area directly influencing both theoretical and applied biology. This is especially important for proactive management of zoonotic parasites such as Echinococcus multilocularis, the etiologic agent of alveolar echinococcosis. Echinococcus multilocularis has a Holarctic distribution; with its geographic range and prevalence increasing recently in areas of the western Palearctic, while its distribution dynamics are poorly understood in the Nearctic. In this paper, we use an ecological niche modeling (ENM) approach to: i) estimate the current spatial distribution of suitable conditions for the parasite in the Nearctic. ii) Evaluate the abiotic and biotic factors influencing the species distribution. iii) Assess the potential impact of climatic change on the distribution of this species in the Nearctic. Additionally, we report two new occurrence records of this parasite that significantly expands its known geographic range. We reviewed the occurrence records of E. multilocularis for the Nearctic. This was complemented by two new records of the species from Maryland and New Mexico identified using morphology and multivariate morphometrics of the rostellar hooks. From these data we created two ENMs using the software Maxent. The first ENM included climatic variables, while the second included the same abiotic data plus biotic information consisting of four host community-related data sets. We evaluated model performance and variable importance to explore the relation of these variables to the parasite niche. Finally, we projected the resulting niche model onto future climate change scenarios. We found that an important portion of the Nearctic has suitable conditions for E. multilocularis with adequate habitat in the West and East of the continent where the parasite has not been detected. We also found that the proposed biotic variables improve the model performance and provide unique information, while the most critical abiotic variable was related to the amount of solar radiation. Finally, under the future emission scenarios explored, the distribution of suitable habitat for the parasite is predicted to increase by 56 {\%} to 76 {\%}. We obtained a robust model that provides detail on the distribution of suitable areas for E. multilocularis, including areas that have not been explored for the presence of the parasite. The host community variables included in this study seem a promising way to include biotic data for ecological parasite niche modeling.",
keywords = "Carnivora, Disease geography, Echinococcosis, Echinococcus multilocularis, Ecological niche model, Maxent, Multivariate statistics, Nearctic, Parasite, Rodentia",
author = "Sebastian Botero-Ca{\~n}ola and Dursahinhan, {Altangerel T.} and R{\'a}cz, {Sara E.} and Lowe, {Parker V.} and Ubelaker, {John E.} and Gardner, {Scott L}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.12933/therya-19-749",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
pages = "91--102",
journal = "Therya",
issn = "2007-3364",
publisher = "Asociacion Mexicana de Mastozoologia",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The ecological niche of echinococcus multilocularis in north America

T2 - Understanding biotic and abiotic determinants of parasite distribution with new records in New Mexico and maryland, United States

AU - Botero-Cañola, Sebastian

AU - Dursahinhan, Altangerel T.

AU - Rácz, Sara E.

AU - Lowe, Parker V.

AU - Ubelaker, John E.

AU - Gardner, Scott L

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Understanding the factors shaping the niche of parasites and its expression over geographical space and through time continues to be a modern scientific challenge with the results of research in this area directly influencing both theoretical and applied biology. This is especially important for proactive management of zoonotic parasites such as Echinococcus multilocularis, the etiologic agent of alveolar echinococcosis. Echinococcus multilocularis has a Holarctic distribution; with its geographic range and prevalence increasing recently in areas of the western Palearctic, while its distribution dynamics are poorly understood in the Nearctic. In this paper, we use an ecological niche modeling (ENM) approach to: i) estimate the current spatial distribution of suitable conditions for the parasite in the Nearctic. ii) Evaluate the abiotic and biotic factors influencing the species distribution. iii) Assess the potential impact of climatic change on the distribution of this species in the Nearctic. Additionally, we report two new occurrence records of this parasite that significantly expands its known geographic range. We reviewed the occurrence records of E. multilocularis for the Nearctic. This was complemented by two new records of the species from Maryland and New Mexico identified using morphology and multivariate morphometrics of the rostellar hooks. From these data we created two ENMs using the software Maxent. The first ENM included climatic variables, while the second included the same abiotic data plus biotic information consisting of four host community-related data sets. We evaluated model performance and variable importance to explore the relation of these variables to the parasite niche. Finally, we projected the resulting niche model onto future climate change scenarios. We found that an important portion of the Nearctic has suitable conditions for E. multilocularis with adequate habitat in the West and East of the continent where the parasite has not been detected. We also found that the proposed biotic variables improve the model performance and provide unique information, while the most critical abiotic variable was related to the amount of solar radiation. Finally, under the future emission scenarios explored, the distribution of suitable habitat for the parasite is predicted to increase by 56 % to 76 %. We obtained a robust model that provides detail on the distribution of suitable areas for E. multilocularis, including areas that have not been explored for the presence of the parasite. The host community variables included in this study seem a promising way to include biotic data for ecological parasite niche modeling.

AB - Understanding the factors shaping the niche of parasites and its expression over geographical space and through time continues to be a modern scientific challenge with the results of research in this area directly influencing both theoretical and applied biology. This is especially important for proactive management of zoonotic parasites such as Echinococcus multilocularis, the etiologic agent of alveolar echinococcosis. Echinococcus multilocularis has a Holarctic distribution; with its geographic range and prevalence increasing recently in areas of the western Palearctic, while its distribution dynamics are poorly understood in the Nearctic. In this paper, we use an ecological niche modeling (ENM) approach to: i) estimate the current spatial distribution of suitable conditions for the parasite in the Nearctic. ii) Evaluate the abiotic and biotic factors influencing the species distribution. iii) Assess the potential impact of climatic change on the distribution of this species in the Nearctic. Additionally, we report two new occurrence records of this parasite that significantly expands its known geographic range. We reviewed the occurrence records of E. multilocularis for the Nearctic. This was complemented by two new records of the species from Maryland and New Mexico identified using morphology and multivariate morphometrics of the rostellar hooks. From these data we created two ENMs using the software Maxent. The first ENM included climatic variables, while the second included the same abiotic data plus biotic information consisting of four host community-related data sets. We evaluated model performance and variable importance to explore the relation of these variables to the parasite niche. Finally, we projected the resulting niche model onto future climate change scenarios. We found that an important portion of the Nearctic has suitable conditions for E. multilocularis with adequate habitat in the West and East of the continent where the parasite has not been detected. We also found that the proposed biotic variables improve the model performance and provide unique information, while the most critical abiotic variable was related to the amount of solar radiation. Finally, under the future emission scenarios explored, the distribution of suitable habitat for the parasite is predicted to increase by 56 % to 76 %. We obtained a robust model that provides detail on the distribution of suitable areas for E. multilocularis, including areas that have not been explored for the presence of the parasite. The host community variables included in this study seem a promising way to include biotic data for ecological parasite niche modeling.

KW - Carnivora

KW - Disease geography

KW - Echinococcosis

KW - Echinococcus multilocularis

KW - Ecological niche model

KW - Maxent

KW - Multivariate statistics

KW - Nearctic

KW - Parasite

KW - Rodentia

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85068752853&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85068752853&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.12933/therya-19-749

DO - 10.12933/therya-19-749

M3 - Article

VL - 10

SP - 91

EP - 102

JO - Therya

JF - Therya

SN - 2007-3364

IS - 2

ER -