The e-incubator: A magnetic resonance imaging-compatible mini incubator

Shadi F. Othman, Karin Wartella, Vahid Khalilzad Sharghi, Huihui Xu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The tissue engineering community has been vocal regarding the need for noninvasive instruments to assess the development of tissue-engineered constructs. Medical imaging has helped fulfill this role. However, specimens allocated to a test tube for imaging cannot be tested for a prolonged period or returned to the incubator. Therefore, samples are essentially wasted due to potential contamination and transfer in a less than optimal growth environment. In turn, we present a standalone, miniature, magnetic resonance imaging-compatible incubator, termed the e-incubator. This incubator uses a microcontroller unit to automatically sense and regulate physiological conditions for tissue culture, thus allowing for concurrent tissue culture and evaluation. The e-incubator also offers an innovative scheme to study underlying mechanisms related to the structural and functional evolution of tissues. Importantly, it offers a key step toward enabling real-time testing of engineered tissues before human transplantation. For validation purposes, we cultured tissue-engineered bone constructs for 4 weeks to test the e-incubator. Importantly, this technology allows for visualizing the evolution of temporal and spatial morphogenesis. In turn, the e-incubator can filter deficient constructs, thereby increasing the success rate of implantation of tissue-engineered constructs, especially as construct design grows in levels of complexity to match the geometry and function of patients' unique needs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347-355
Number of pages9
JournalTissue Engineering - Part C: Methods
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

Fingerprint

Incubators
Magnetic resonance
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Tissue
Imaging techniques
Tissue culture
Medical imaging
Microcontrollers
Tissue engineering
Bone
Contamination
Diagnostic Imaging
Tissue Engineering
Morphogenesis
Geometry
Transplantation
Testing
Technology
Bone and Bones
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

The e-incubator : A magnetic resonance imaging-compatible mini incubator. / Othman, Shadi F.; Wartella, Karin; Khalilzad Sharghi, Vahid; Xu, Huihui.

In: Tissue Engineering - Part C: Methods, Vol. 21, No. 4, 01.04.2015, p. 347-355.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Othman, Shadi F. ; Wartella, Karin ; Khalilzad Sharghi, Vahid ; Xu, Huihui. / The e-incubator : A magnetic resonance imaging-compatible mini incubator. In: Tissue Engineering - Part C: Methods. 2015 ; Vol. 21, No. 4. pp. 347-355.
@article{23672552d4d145b9afa63cd40fed255f,
title = "The e-incubator: A magnetic resonance imaging-compatible mini incubator",
abstract = "The tissue engineering community has been vocal regarding the need for noninvasive instruments to assess the development of tissue-engineered constructs. Medical imaging has helped fulfill this role. However, specimens allocated to a test tube for imaging cannot be tested for a prolonged period or returned to the incubator. Therefore, samples are essentially wasted due to potential contamination and transfer in a less than optimal growth environment. In turn, we present a standalone, miniature, magnetic resonance imaging-compatible incubator, termed the e-incubator. This incubator uses a microcontroller unit to automatically sense and regulate physiological conditions for tissue culture, thus allowing for concurrent tissue culture and evaluation. The e-incubator also offers an innovative scheme to study underlying mechanisms related to the structural and functional evolution of tissues. Importantly, it offers a key step toward enabling real-time testing of engineered tissues before human transplantation. For validation purposes, we cultured tissue-engineered bone constructs for 4 weeks to test the e-incubator. Importantly, this technology allows for visualizing the evolution of temporal and spatial morphogenesis. In turn, the e-incubator can filter deficient constructs, thereby increasing the success rate of implantation of tissue-engineered constructs, especially as construct design grows in levels of complexity to match the geometry and function of patients' unique needs.",
author = "Othman, {Shadi F.} and Karin Wartella and {Khalilzad Sharghi}, Vahid and Huihui Xu",
year = "2015",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/ten.tec.2014.0273",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "347--355",
journal = "Tissue Engineering - Part C: Methods",
issn = "1937-3384",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The e-incubator

T2 - A magnetic resonance imaging-compatible mini incubator

AU - Othman, Shadi F.

AU - Wartella, Karin

AU - Khalilzad Sharghi, Vahid

AU - Xu, Huihui

PY - 2015/4/1

Y1 - 2015/4/1

N2 - The tissue engineering community has been vocal regarding the need for noninvasive instruments to assess the development of tissue-engineered constructs. Medical imaging has helped fulfill this role. However, specimens allocated to a test tube for imaging cannot be tested for a prolonged period or returned to the incubator. Therefore, samples are essentially wasted due to potential contamination and transfer in a less than optimal growth environment. In turn, we present a standalone, miniature, magnetic resonance imaging-compatible incubator, termed the e-incubator. This incubator uses a microcontroller unit to automatically sense and regulate physiological conditions for tissue culture, thus allowing for concurrent tissue culture and evaluation. The e-incubator also offers an innovative scheme to study underlying mechanisms related to the structural and functional evolution of tissues. Importantly, it offers a key step toward enabling real-time testing of engineered tissues before human transplantation. For validation purposes, we cultured tissue-engineered bone constructs for 4 weeks to test the e-incubator. Importantly, this technology allows for visualizing the evolution of temporal and spatial morphogenesis. In turn, the e-incubator can filter deficient constructs, thereby increasing the success rate of implantation of tissue-engineered constructs, especially as construct design grows in levels of complexity to match the geometry and function of patients' unique needs.

AB - The tissue engineering community has been vocal regarding the need for noninvasive instruments to assess the development of tissue-engineered constructs. Medical imaging has helped fulfill this role. However, specimens allocated to a test tube for imaging cannot be tested for a prolonged period or returned to the incubator. Therefore, samples are essentially wasted due to potential contamination and transfer in a less than optimal growth environment. In turn, we present a standalone, miniature, magnetic resonance imaging-compatible incubator, termed the e-incubator. This incubator uses a microcontroller unit to automatically sense and regulate physiological conditions for tissue culture, thus allowing for concurrent tissue culture and evaluation. The e-incubator also offers an innovative scheme to study underlying mechanisms related to the structural and functional evolution of tissues. Importantly, it offers a key step toward enabling real-time testing of engineered tissues before human transplantation. For validation purposes, we cultured tissue-engineered bone constructs for 4 weeks to test the e-incubator. Importantly, this technology allows for visualizing the evolution of temporal and spatial morphogenesis. In turn, the e-incubator can filter deficient constructs, thereby increasing the success rate of implantation of tissue-engineered constructs, especially as construct design grows in levels of complexity to match the geometry and function of patients' unique needs.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84926504784&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84926504784&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/ten.tec.2014.0273

DO - 10.1089/ten.tec.2014.0273

M3 - Article

C2 - 25190214

AN - SCOPUS:84926504784

VL - 21

SP - 347

EP - 355

JO - Tissue Engineering - Part C: Methods

JF - Tissue Engineering - Part C: Methods

SN - 1937-3384

IS - 4

ER -