The development of psychopathy

R. James R. Blair, K. S. Peschardt, S. Budhani, D. G.V. Mitchell, D. S. Pine

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

298 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current review focuses on the construct of psychopathy, conceptualized as a clinical entity that is fundamentally distinct from a heterogeneous collection of syndromes encompassed by the term 'conduct disorder'. We will provide an account of the development of psychopathy at multiple levels: ultimate causal (the genetic or social primary cause), molecular, neural, cognitive and behavioral. The following main claims will be made: (1) that there is a stronger genetic as opposed to social ultimate cause to this disorder. The types of social causes proposed (e.g., childhood sexual/physical abuse) should elevate emotional responsiveness, not lead to the specific form of reduced responsiveness seen in psychopathy; (2) The genetic influence leads to the emotional dysfunction that is the core of psychopathy; (3) The genetic influence at the molecular level remains unknown. However, it appears to impact the functional integrity of the amygdala and orbital/ventrolateral frontal cortex (and possibly additional systems); (4) Disruption within these two neural systems leads to impairment in the ability to form stimulus-reinforcement associations and to alter stimulus-response associations as a function of contingency change. These impairments disrupt the impact of standard socialization techniques and increase the risk for frustration-induced reactive aggression respectively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)262-275
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines
Volume47
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2006

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Conduct Disorder
Aptitude
Frustration
Socialization
Sex Offenses
Frontal Lobe
Amygdala
Aggression
Reinforcement (Psychology)
Physical Abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The development of psychopathy. / Blair, R. James R.; Peschardt, K. S.; Budhani, S.; Mitchell, D. G.V.; Pine, D. S.

In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, Vol. 47, No. 3-4, 01.03.2006, p. 262-275.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Blair, R. James R. ; Peschardt, K. S. ; Budhani, S. ; Mitchell, D. G.V. ; Pine, D. S. / The development of psychopathy. In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines. 2006 ; Vol. 47, No. 3-4. pp. 262-275.
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