The contribution of smoking to socioeconomic differentials in mortality: Results from the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study, Australia

Mohammad Siahpush, Dallas English, John Powles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess the contribution of smoking to the inverse association of mortality with years of formal education in men in Australia. Design: Data were obtained from a prospective cohort study that included 17 049 men in Melbourne recruited from 1990 to 1994, most of whom were aged between 40 and 69 years at baseline. The outcome measured was all-cause mortality. The contribution of smoking to socioeconomic status differentials was estimated by including smoking as a variable in a Cox's proportional hazards model that also included education and other potential confounding variables. Results: In men, the association between education and mortality was attenuated after adjustment for smoking, and the aetiological fraction for low levels of education was reduced from 10.5% to 10.6%. Conclusions: In men, smoking contributes substantially to socioeconomic differentials in mortality. Effective policies and interventions that target smoking among socially disadvantaged groups may substantially reduce socioeconomic differentials in health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1077-1079
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
Volume60
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

Fingerprint

Cohort Studies
Smoking
Mortality
Education
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Vulnerable Populations
Proportional Hazards Models
Social Class
Prospective Studies
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The contribution of smoking to socioeconomic differentials in mortality : Results from the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study, Australia. / Siahpush, Mohammad; English, Dallas; Powles, John.

In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, Vol. 60, No. 12, 01.12.2006, p. 1077-1079.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f23100b88e674723b02c9633c0084627,
title = "The contribution of smoking to socioeconomic differentials in mortality: Results from the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study, Australia",
abstract = "Objective: To assess the contribution of smoking to the inverse association of mortality with years of formal education in men in Australia. Design: Data were obtained from a prospective cohort study that included 17 049 men in Melbourne recruited from 1990 to 1994, most of whom were aged between 40 and 69 years at baseline. The outcome measured was all-cause mortality. The contribution of smoking to socioeconomic status differentials was estimated by including smoking as a variable in a Cox's proportional hazards model that also included education and other potential confounding variables. Results: In men, the association between education and mortality was attenuated after adjustment for smoking, and the aetiological fraction for low levels of education was reduced from 10.5{\%} to 10.6{\%}. Conclusions: In men, smoking contributes substantially to socioeconomic differentials in mortality. Effective policies and interventions that target smoking among socially disadvantaged groups may substantially reduce socioeconomic differentials in health.",
author = "Mohammad Siahpush and Dallas English and John Powles",
year = "2006",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1136/jech.2005.042572",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "60",
pages = "1077--1079",
journal = "Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health",
issn = "0143-005X",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The contribution of smoking to socioeconomic differentials in mortality

T2 - Results from the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study, Australia

AU - Siahpush, Mohammad

AU - English, Dallas

AU - Powles, John

PY - 2006/12/1

Y1 - 2006/12/1

N2 - Objective: To assess the contribution of smoking to the inverse association of mortality with years of formal education in men in Australia. Design: Data were obtained from a prospective cohort study that included 17 049 men in Melbourne recruited from 1990 to 1994, most of whom were aged between 40 and 69 years at baseline. The outcome measured was all-cause mortality. The contribution of smoking to socioeconomic status differentials was estimated by including smoking as a variable in a Cox's proportional hazards model that also included education and other potential confounding variables. Results: In men, the association between education and mortality was attenuated after adjustment for smoking, and the aetiological fraction for low levels of education was reduced from 10.5% to 10.6%. Conclusions: In men, smoking contributes substantially to socioeconomic differentials in mortality. Effective policies and interventions that target smoking among socially disadvantaged groups may substantially reduce socioeconomic differentials in health.

AB - Objective: To assess the contribution of smoking to the inverse association of mortality with years of formal education in men in Australia. Design: Data were obtained from a prospective cohort study that included 17 049 men in Melbourne recruited from 1990 to 1994, most of whom were aged between 40 and 69 years at baseline. The outcome measured was all-cause mortality. The contribution of smoking to socioeconomic status differentials was estimated by including smoking as a variable in a Cox's proportional hazards model that also included education and other potential confounding variables. Results: In men, the association between education and mortality was attenuated after adjustment for smoking, and the aetiological fraction for low levels of education was reduced from 10.5% to 10.6%. Conclusions: In men, smoking contributes substantially to socioeconomic differentials in mortality. Effective policies and interventions that target smoking among socially disadvantaged groups may substantially reduce socioeconomic differentials in health.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33845273333&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33845273333&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/jech.2005.042572

DO - 10.1136/jech.2005.042572

M3 - Article

C2 - 17108305

AN - SCOPUS:33845273333

VL - 60

SP - 1077

EP - 1079

JO - Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health

JF - Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health

SN - 0143-005X

IS - 12

ER -