The content coverage and organizational structure of terminologies

the example of postoperative pain.

M. R. Harris, J. R. Graves, Linda M Herrick, P. L. Elkin, C. G. Chute

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Concepts such as symptoms present specific representational challenges in the EMR. This is because concepts without clear boundaries and external referents such as physical objects can only be examined against other terminology-based concept representation systems. The truth and falsity of such concept representation is therefore relative to the terminology-based systems. Using the concept of acute postoperative pain as an example, we examined three terminology based approaches to representing the concept. Widely varying coverage across existing clinical terminologies was evident, although the common clinical approach to reporting attributes of symptoms provided a useful organizational structure and should be examined in relation to developing terminology and information models.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-339
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings / AMIA ... Annual Symposium. AMIA Symposium
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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Postoperative Pain
Terminology
Acute Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The content coverage and organizational structure of terminologies : the example of postoperative pain. / Harris, M. R.; Graves, J. R.; Herrick, Linda M; Elkin, P. L.; Chute, C. G.

In: Proceedings / AMIA ... Annual Symposium. AMIA Symposium, 01.01.2000, p. 335-339.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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