The Association between Cultural Orientation and Drinking Behaviors among University Students in Wuhan, China

Hongxiu Tang, Weibin Cai, Hongjing Wang, Qing Zhang, Ling Qian, Duane F. Shell, Ian M. Newman, Ping Yin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This study examines the association between cultural orientation and drinking behaviors among university students. Cultural orientation is the measure of how the cultural values of individuals living in their own society are influenced by cultural values introduced from the outside. Methods: In 2011, a cross-sectional survey collected data from 1279 university students from six universities in central China. Participants used a likert scale to rank a series of statements reflecting cultural values from the previously validated Chinese Cultural Orientation Scale and answered questions about their drinking behaviors and socio-demographic characteristics. Results: Statistically significant differences in cultural orientation were observed for gender, hometown and type of university attendance. Traditional-oriented students were more likely to be occasional drinkers or nondrinkers, while marginal-oriented students, bicultural-oriented students and western-oriented students were more likely to be regular drinkers. Bicultural orientation (OR = 1.80, P<0.05) and marginal orientation (OR = 1.64, P<0.05) increased the likelihood of the student being regular drinking, compared to students with traditional orientations. Males (OR = 4.40, P<0.05) had a higher likelihood of regular drinking than females, graduate students (OR = 2.59, P<0.05) had a higher likelihood of regular drinking than undergraduates, students from urban areas (OR = 1.79, P<0.05) had a higher likelihood of regular drinking than those from towns/rural areas, and students attending key universities (OR = 0.48, P<0.05) had a lower likelihood of regular drinking than those attending general universities. Conclusions: Cultural orientation influences drinking behaviors. Traditional cultural orientation was associated with less drinking while western cultural orientation, marginal cultural orientation and bicultural orientation were associated with more drinking. The role of gender, hometown and university attendance is partially moderated through the influence of cultural orientation. The relationship between a traditional cultural orientation and alcohol drinking suggests that traditional Chinese cultural values should be examined for their role in possibly reducing alcohol-related risks through education and policy initiatives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere54796
JournalPloS one
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 30 2013

Fingerprint

Drinking Behavior
college students
drinking
China
Students
students
Drinking
cultural values
cultural differences
Alcohols
sociodemographic characteristics
gender
cross-sectional studies
rural areas
towns
urban areas
Alcohol Drinking
education
alcohols
Cross-Sectional Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

Cite this

The Association between Cultural Orientation and Drinking Behaviors among University Students in Wuhan, China. / Tang, Hongxiu; Cai, Weibin; Wang, Hongjing; Zhang, Qing; Qian, Ling; Shell, Duane F.; Newman, Ian M.; Yin, Ping.

In: PloS one, Vol. 8, No. 1, e54796, 30.01.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tang, H, Cai, W, Wang, H, Zhang, Q, Qian, L, Shell, DF, Newman, IM & Yin, P 2013, 'The Association between Cultural Orientation and Drinking Behaviors among University Students in Wuhan, China', PloS one, vol. 8, no. 1, e54796. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0054796
Tang, Hongxiu ; Cai, Weibin ; Wang, Hongjing ; Zhang, Qing ; Qian, Ling ; Shell, Duane F. ; Newman, Ian M. ; Yin, Ping. / The Association between Cultural Orientation and Drinking Behaviors among University Students in Wuhan, China. In: PloS one. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 1.
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abstract = "Objectives: This study examines the association between cultural orientation and drinking behaviors among university students. Cultural orientation is the measure of how the cultural values of individuals living in their own society are influenced by cultural values introduced from the outside. Methods: In 2011, a cross-sectional survey collected data from 1279 university students from six universities in central China. Participants used a likert scale to rank a series of statements reflecting cultural values from the previously validated Chinese Cultural Orientation Scale and answered questions about their drinking behaviors and socio-demographic characteristics. Results: Statistically significant differences in cultural orientation were observed for gender, hometown and type of university attendance. Traditional-oriented students were more likely to be occasional drinkers or nondrinkers, while marginal-oriented students, bicultural-oriented students and western-oriented students were more likely to be regular drinkers. Bicultural orientation (OR = 1.80, P<0.05) and marginal orientation (OR = 1.64, P<0.05) increased the likelihood of the student being regular drinking, compared to students with traditional orientations. Males (OR = 4.40, P<0.05) had a higher likelihood of regular drinking than females, graduate students (OR = 2.59, P<0.05) had a higher likelihood of regular drinking than undergraduates, students from urban areas (OR = 1.79, P<0.05) had a higher likelihood of regular drinking than those from towns/rural areas, and students attending key universities (OR = 0.48, P<0.05) had a lower likelihood of regular drinking than those attending general universities. Conclusions: Cultural orientation influences drinking behaviors. Traditional cultural orientation was associated with less drinking while western cultural orientation, marginal cultural orientation and bicultural orientation were associated with more drinking. The role of gender, hometown and university attendance is partially moderated through the influence of cultural orientation. The relationship between a traditional cultural orientation and alcohol drinking suggests that traditional Chinese cultural values should be examined for their role in possibly reducing alcohol-related risks through education and policy initiatives.",
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