The Antioxidant, MnTE-2-PyP, Prevents Side-Effects Incurred by Prostate Cancer Irradiation

Rebecca E. Oberley-Deegan, Joshua J. Steffan, Kyle O. Rove, Kathryn M. Pate, Michael W. Weaver, Ivan Spasojevic, Barbara Frederick, David Raben, Randall B. Meacham, James D. Crapo, Hari K. Koul

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer, with an estimated 240,000 new cases reported annually in the United States. Due to early detection and advances in therapies, more than 90% of patients will survive 10 years post diagnosis and treatment. Radiation is a treatment option often used to treat localized disease; however, while radiation is very effective at killing tumor cells, normal tissues are damaged as well. Potential side-effects due to prostate cancer-related radiation therapy include bowel inflammation, erectile dysfunction, urethral stricture, rectal bleeding and incontinence. Currently, radiation therapy for prostate cancer does not include the administration of therapeutic agents to reduce these side effects and protect normal tissues from radiation-induced damage. In the current study, we show that the small molecular weight antioxidant, MnTE-2-PyP, protects normal tissues from radiation-induced damage in the lower abdomen in rats. Specifically, MnTE-2-PyP protected skin, prostate, and testes from radiation-induced damage. MnTE-2-PyP also protected from erectile dysfunction, a persistent problem regardless of the type of radiation techniques used because the penile neurovascular bundles lay in the peripheral zones of the prostate, where most prostate cancers reside. Based on previous studies showing that MnTE-2-PyP, in combination with radiation, further reduces subcutaneous tumor growth, we believe that MnTE-2-PyP represents an excellent radioprotectant in combination radiotherapy for cancer in general and specifically for prostate cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere44178
JournalPloS one
Volume7
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 12 2012

Fingerprint

prostatic neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
Antioxidants
irradiation
adverse effects
Irradiation
Radiation
antioxidants
radiotherapy
Radiotherapy
neoplasms
Erectile Dysfunction
Tissue
therapeutics
Tumors
Prostate
Neoplasms
abdomen
Urethral Stricture
hemorrhage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

Cite this

Oberley-Deegan, R. E., Steffan, J. J., Rove, K. O., Pate, K. M., Weaver, M. W., Spasojevic, I., ... Koul, H. K. (2012). The Antioxidant, MnTE-2-PyP, Prevents Side-Effects Incurred by Prostate Cancer Irradiation. PloS one, 7(9), [e44178]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0044178

The Antioxidant, MnTE-2-PyP, Prevents Side-Effects Incurred by Prostate Cancer Irradiation. / Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E.; Steffan, Joshua J.; Rove, Kyle O.; Pate, Kathryn M.; Weaver, Michael W.; Spasojevic, Ivan; Frederick, Barbara; Raben, David; Meacham, Randall B.; Crapo, James D.; Koul, Hari K.

In: PloS one, Vol. 7, No. 9, e44178, 12.09.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oberley-Deegan, RE, Steffan, JJ, Rove, KO, Pate, KM, Weaver, MW, Spasojevic, I, Frederick, B, Raben, D, Meacham, RB, Crapo, JD & Koul, HK 2012, 'The Antioxidant, MnTE-2-PyP, Prevents Side-Effects Incurred by Prostate Cancer Irradiation', PloS one, vol. 7, no. 9, e44178. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0044178
Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E. ; Steffan, Joshua J. ; Rove, Kyle O. ; Pate, Kathryn M. ; Weaver, Michael W. ; Spasojevic, Ivan ; Frederick, Barbara ; Raben, David ; Meacham, Randall B. ; Crapo, James D. ; Koul, Hari K. / The Antioxidant, MnTE-2-PyP, Prevents Side-Effects Incurred by Prostate Cancer Irradiation. In: PloS one. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 9.
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