The 15-minute visit

How can primary care better identify and treat depression?

Daniel S. Felix, W. David Robinson, Jenenne A Geske, Paige W. Toller, Elisabeth L Backer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A physician's ability to recognize depression depends almost entirely upon their interactions and communication with patients. Understanding the ways that patients and physicians discuss symptoms of depression can help explain why depression is often underrecognized in primary care. This article describes patterns observed in regular clinical encounters with physicians and depressed patients to help paint a picture of the attention currently given to the psychosocial symptoms of depression. The goal is to provide suggestions for primary care physicians and to make an argument for systemic change in the larger health care system that would allow for more comprehensive, collaborative, and patient-centered care for depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalConsultant
Volume54
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Primary Health Care
Depression
Physicians
Patient-Centered Care
Aptitude
Paint
Primary Care Physicians
Communication
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The 15-minute visit : How can primary care better identify and treat depression? / Felix, Daniel S.; Robinson, W. David; Geske, Jenenne A; Toller, Paige W.; Backer, Elisabeth L.

In: Consultant, Vol. 54, No. 2, 01.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Felix, Daniel S. ; Robinson, W. David ; Geske, Jenenne A ; Toller, Paige W. ; Backer, Elisabeth L. / The 15-minute visit : How can primary care better identify and treat depression?. In: Consultant. 2014 ; Vol. 54, No. 2.
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