Tailored telephone education to promote awareness and adoption of fruit and vegetable recommendations among urban and mostly immigrant black men: A randomized controlled trial

Randi L. Wolf, Stephen J. Lepore, Jonathan L. Vandergrift, Charles E. Basch, Amy L. Yaroch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Fruit and vegetable (FV) intake in black men are far below national recommendations. Methods: Urban, primarily immigrant, black men (n = 490) from the New York City metropolitan area participating in the Cancer Awareness and Prevention (CAP) Trial (2005-2007) were randomly assigned to one of two intervention groups: 1) FV Education (FVE) or 2) Prostate Education (PE). Both interventions entailed a mailed brochure plus two tailored telephone education (TTE) calls. Outcomes, measured at baseline and at eight months, included knowledge of FV recommendations, perceived benefits, stage of readiness to adopt recommendations and self-reported FV consumption. Results: At follow-up, the FVE group consumed an average of 1.2 more FV servings per day than the PE group (P < 0.001; adjusted for baseline). The FVE group also demonstrated increases in knowledge about recommended FV amounts (P < 0.01) and appropriate serving sizes (P < 0.05), and in the percent of participants moving from a lower to a higher stage of readiness to adopt FV recommendations (P < 0.05). The FVE group did not demonstrate increases in knowledge related to the importance of eating a colorful variety or in the ability to name potential health benefits. Conclusions: TTE can be a practical and moderately effective intervention for raising awareness of FV recommendations and for promoting FV consumption in urban and primarily immigrant black men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)32-38
Number of pages7
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume48
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

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Telephone
Vegetables
Fruit
Randomized Controlled Trials
Education
Prostate
Serving Size
Pamphlets
Insurance Benefits
Names
Eating

Keywords

  • Diet
  • Fruits and vegetables
  • Immigrant population
  • Men
  • Minority
  • Randomized clinical trial
  • Telephone education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Tailored telephone education to promote awareness and adoption of fruit and vegetable recommendations among urban and mostly immigrant black men : A randomized controlled trial. / Wolf, Randi L.; Lepore, Stephen J.; Vandergrift, Jonathan L.; Basch, Charles E.; Yaroch, Amy L.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 48, No. 1, 01.01.2009, p. 32-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wolf, Randi L. ; Lepore, Stephen J. ; Vandergrift, Jonathan L. ; Basch, Charles E. ; Yaroch, Amy L. / Tailored telephone education to promote awareness and adoption of fruit and vegetable recommendations among urban and mostly immigrant black men : A randomized controlled trial. In: Preventive Medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 48, No. 1. pp. 32-38.
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