T cell receptor-dependent activation of human lymphocytes through cell surface ganglioside GT1b

Implications for innate immunity

Jack F. Bukowski, Maria G. Roncarolo, Hergen Spits, Michael S. Krangel, Craig T. Morita, Michael B. Brenner, Hamid Band

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Gangliosides form a component of the glycosphingolipid-rich membrane microdomains recently shown to play an important role in receptor signal transduction. Specific gangliosides also serve as receptors for binding and internalization of bacterial toxins. In the course of characterizing the basis of the native tetanus toxin (TTx) reactivity of a human γδ T cell clone, we observed that transfer of the TCR was required to impart TTx reactivity on a TCR-negative recipient T cell. However, the reconstitution of toxin reactivity could be achieved regardless of the antigen specificity of the TCR chains. Further analysis showed that the T cell recognition of native TTx was dependent on the presence of its ganglioside receptor, GT1b, on the T cell surface. Incorporation of exogenous GT1b into plasma membrane conferred TTx reactivity on otherwise non-reactive T cells provided these cells expressed the TCR. Finally, reconstitution of TCR-negative Jurkat T cells with a CD8-CD3ζ chain chimera demonstrated that the cytoplasmic region of the CD3ζ chain was sufficient to couple ganglioside-mediated TTx binding to T cell activation. These data reveal a novel mode of TCR-dependent reactivity to a bacterial toxin that could mobilize a large subset of T cells, thus representing a form of innate immunity. Given the possibility that endogenous ligands may bind to cell surface gangliosides, regulation of their levels and topology on the cell surface may constitute an immunoregulatory mechanism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3199-3206
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Immunology
Volume30
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 30 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Lymphocyte Activation
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
Innate Immunity
Tetanus Toxin
T-Lymphocytes
Gangliosides
Bacterial Toxins
Membrane Microdomains
Glycosphingolipids
Jurkat Cells
T-Lymphocyte Subsets
trisialoganglioside GT1
Signal Transduction
Clone Cells
Cell Membrane
Ligands
Antigens

Keywords

  • Cellular activation
  • Immunity-bacteria
  • Lipid mediators
  • Signal transduction
  • T cell receptor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

T cell receptor-dependent activation of human lymphocytes through cell surface ganglioside GT1b : Implications for innate immunity. / Bukowski, Jack F.; Roncarolo, Maria G.; Spits, Hergen; Krangel, Michael S.; Morita, Craig T.; Brenner, Michael B.; Band, Hamid.

In: European Journal of Immunology, Vol. 30, No. 11, 30.11.2000, p. 3199-3206.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bukowski, Jack F. ; Roncarolo, Maria G. ; Spits, Hergen ; Krangel, Michael S. ; Morita, Craig T. ; Brenner, Michael B. ; Band, Hamid. / T cell receptor-dependent activation of human lymphocytes through cell surface ganglioside GT1b : Implications for innate immunity. In: European Journal of Immunology. 2000 ; Vol. 30, No. 11. pp. 3199-3206.
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