Systems biology of the functional and dysfunctional endothelium

Jennifer Frueh, Nataly Maimari, Takayuki Homma, Sandra M. Bovens, Ryan M. Pedrigi, Leila Towhidi, Rob Krams

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This review provides an overview of the effect of blood flow on endothelial cell (EC) signalling pathways, applying microarray technologies to cultured cells, and in vivo studies of normal and atherosclerotic animals. It is found that in cultured ECs, 5-10% of genes are up- or down-regulated in response to fluid flow, whereas only 3-6% of genes are regulated by varying levels of fluid flow. Of all genes, 90% are regulated by the steady part of fluid flow and 10% by pulsatile components. The associated gene profiles show high variability from experiment to experiment depending on experimental conditions, and importantly, the bioinformatical methods used to analyse the data. Despite this high variability, the current data sets can be summarized with the concept of endothelial priming. In this concept, fluid flows confer protection by an up-regulation of anti-atherogenic, anti-thrombotic, and anti-inflammatory gene signatures. Consequently, predilection sites of atherosclerosis, which are associated with low-shear stress, confer low protection for atherosclerosis and are, therefore, more sensitive to high cholesterol levels. Recent studies in intact non-atherosclerotic animals confirmed these in vitro studies, and suggest that a spatial component might be present. Despite the large variability, a few signalling pathways were consistently present in the majority of studies. These were the MAPK, the nuclear factor-κB, and the endothelial nitric oxide synthase-NO pathways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)334-341
Number of pages8
JournalCardiovascular research
Volume99
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2013

Fingerprint

Systems Biology
Endothelium
Genes
Atherosclerosis
Pulsatile Flow
Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III
Hypercholesterolemia
Cultured Cells
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Up-Regulation
Endothelial Cells
Technology

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Gene deconvolution
  • Mechanobiology
  • Shear stress
  • Systems biology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Frueh, J., Maimari, N., Homma, T., Bovens, S. M., Pedrigi, R. M., Towhidi, L., & Krams, R. (2013). Systems biology of the functional and dysfunctional endothelium. Cardiovascular research, 99(2), 334-341. https://doi.org/10.1093/cvr/cvt108

Systems biology of the functional and dysfunctional endothelium. / Frueh, Jennifer; Maimari, Nataly; Homma, Takayuki; Bovens, Sandra M.; Pedrigi, Ryan M.; Towhidi, Leila; Krams, Rob.

In: Cardiovascular research, Vol. 99, No. 2, 15.07.2013, p. 334-341.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Frueh, J, Maimari, N, Homma, T, Bovens, SM, Pedrigi, RM, Towhidi, L & Krams, R 2013, 'Systems biology of the functional and dysfunctional endothelium', Cardiovascular research, vol. 99, no. 2, pp. 334-341. https://doi.org/10.1093/cvr/cvt108
Frueh J, Maimari N, Homma T, Bovens SM, Pedrigi RM, Towhidi L et al. Systems biology of the functional and dysfunctional endothelium. Cardiovascular research. 2013 Jul 15;99(2):334-341. https://doi.org/10.1093/cvr/cvt108
Frueh, Jennifer ; Maimari, Nataly ; Homma, Takayuki ; Bovens, Sandra M. ; Pedrigi, Ryan M. ; Towhidi, Leila ; Krams, Rob. / Systems biology of the functional and dysfunctional endothelium. In: Cardiovascular research. 2013 ; Vol. 99, No. 2. pp. 334-341.
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