Systemic blood flow to sheep lung

Comparison of flow probes and microspheres

K. D. Ashley, D. N. Herndon, L. D. Traber, D. L. Traber, K. Deubel-Ashley, Joseph Clarke Stothert Jr, G. C. Kramer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Discrepancies exist between experimental measurements of the systemic blood flow to sheep lung by use of microsphere techniques and flow probes on the bronchial artery. In these studies, we simultaneously measured the blood flow through the bronchial artery, using a transit time flow probe, and the systemic blood flow to left lung, using radioactive microspheres. All measurements were made on conscious sheep previously prepared with chronic catheterizations of the left atrium, aorta, and vena cava and a flow probe around the bronchial artery. Inflatable occluder cuffs were placed around the pulmonary and bronchoesophageal arteries. Bronchial artery blood flow in six sheep was 25.3 ± 5.2 ml/min or 0.4% of the cardiac output. Systemic blood flow to left lung, measured with microspheres, was 54.1 ± 14.2 ml/min. Calculated systemic blood flow to that portion of sheep lung perfused by the bronchial artery was 127.6 ± 35.3 ml/min or 1.9% of cardiac output. Occlusion of the bronchoesophageal artery reduced bronchial artery flow to near zero, whereas total systemic blood to the lung was reduced by only 55%. Blood flow to the intraparenchymal cartilaginous airways was reduced 60-90% after occlusion of the bronchoesophageal artery. Sheep, like most mammals, have multiple and complex systemic arterial inputs to the lungs. We conclude that multiple branches of the bronchoesophageal artery provide most but not all of the systemic blood flow to the intraparenchymal cartilaginous airways but that over one-half of the total systemic blood flow to sheep lung comes from sources other than the common bronchial artery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1996-2003
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume73
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

Fingerprint

Microspheres
Bronchial Arteries
Sheep
Lung
Arteries
Cardiac Output
Venae Cavae
Heart Atria
Catheterization
Pulmonary Artery
Aorta
Mammals

Keywords

  • airways
  • bronchial blood flow
  • pulmonary circulation
  • trachea

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Physiology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Ashley, K. D., Herndon, D. N., Traber, L. D., Traber, D. L., Deubel-Ashley, K., Stothert Jr, J. C., & Kramer, G. C. (1992). Systemic blood flow to sheep lung: Comparison of flow probes and microspheres. Journal of Applied Physiology, 73(5), 1996-2003.

Systemic blood flow to sheep lung : Comparison of flow probes and microspheres. / Ashley, K. D.; Herndon, D. N.; Traber, L. D.; Traber, D. L.; Deubel-Ashley, K.; Stothert Jr, Joseph Clarke; Kramer, G. C.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 73, No. 5, 01.01.1992, p. 1996-2003.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ashley, KD, Herndon, DN, Traber, LD, Traber, DL, Deubel-Ashley, K, Stothert Jr, JC & Kramer, GC 1992, 'Systemic blood flow to sheep lung: Comparison of flow probes and microspheres', Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 73, no. 5, pp. 1996-2003.
Ashley KD, Herndon DN, Traber LD, Traber DL, Deubel-Ashley K, Stothert Jr JC et al. Systemic blood flow to sheep lung: Comparison of flow probes and microspheres. Journal of Applied Physiology. 1992 Jan 1;73(5):1996-2003.
Ashley, K. D. ; Herndon, D. N. ; Traber, L. D. ; Traber, D. L. ; Deubel-Ashley, K. ; Stothert Jr, Joseph Clarke ; Kramer, G. C. / Systemic blood flow to sheep lung : Comparison of flow probes and microspheres. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 1992 ; Vol. 73, No. 5. pp. 1996-2003.
@article{5365e83e82384ddfa8aaea403c9cc921,
title = "Systemic blood flow to sheep lung: Comparison of flow probes and microspheres",
abstract = "Discrepancies exist between experimental measurements of the systemic blood flow to sheep lung by use of microsphere techniques and flow probes on the bronchial artery. In these studies, we simultaneously measured the blood flow through the bronchial artery, using a transit time flow probe, and the systemic blood flow to left lung, using radioactive microspheres. All measurements were made on conscious sheep previously prepared with chronic catheterizations of the left atrium, aorta, and vena cava and a flow probe around the bronchial artery. Inflatable occluder cuffs were placed around the pulmonary and bronchoesophageal arteries. Bronchial artery blood flow in six sheep was 25.3 ± 5.2 ml/min or 0.4{\%} of the cardiac output. Systemic blood flow to left lung, measured with microspheres, was 54.1 ± 14.2 ml/min. Calculated systemic blood flow to that portion of sheep lung perfused by the bronchial artery was 127.6 ± 35.3 ml/min or 1.9{\%} of cardiac output. Occlusion of the bronchoesophageal artery reduced bronchial artery flow to near zero, whereas total systemic blood to the lung was reduced by only 55{\%}. Blood flow to the intraparenchymal cartilaginous airways was reduced 60-90{\%} after occlusion of the bronchoesophageal artery. Sheep, like most mammals, have multiple and complex systemic arterial inputs to the lungs. We conclude that multiple branches of the bronchoesophageal artery provide most but not all of the systemic blood flow to the intraparenchymal cartilaginous airways but that over one-half of the total systemic blood flow to sheep lung comes from sources other than the common bronchial artery.",
keywords = "airways, bronchial blood flow, pulmonary circulation, trachea",
author = "Ashley, {K. D.} and Herndon, {D. N.} and Traber, {L. D.} and Traber, {D. L.} and K. Deubel-Ashley and {Stothert Jr}, {Joseph Clarke} and Kramer, {G. C.}",
year = "1992",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "73",
pages = "1996--2003",
journal = "Journal of Applied Physiology",
issn = "0161-7567",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Systemic blood flow to sheep lung

T2 - Comparison of flow probes and microspheres

AU - Ashley, K. D.

AU - Herndon, D. N.

AU - Traber, L. D.

AU - Traber, D. L.

AU - Deubel-Ashley, K.

AU - Stothert Jr, Joseph Clarke

AU - Kramer, G. C.

PY - 1992/1/1

Y1 - 1992/1/1

N2 - Discrepancies exist between experimental measurements of the systemic blood flow to sheep lung by use of microsphere techniques and flow probes on the bronchial artery. In these studies, we simultaneously measured the blood flow through the bronchial artery, using a transit time flow probe, and the systemic blood flow to left lung, using radioactive microspheres. All measurements were made on conscious sheep previously prepared with chronic catheterizations of the left atrium, aorta, and vena cava and a flow probe around the bronchial artery. Inflatable occluder cuffs were placed around the pulmonary and bronchoesophageal arteries. Bronchial artery blood flow in six sheep was 25.3 ± 5.2 ml/min or 0.4% of the cardiac output. Systemic blood flow to left lung, measured with microspheres, was 54.1 ± 14.2 ml/min. Calculated systemic blood flow to that portion of sheep lung perfused by the bronchial artery was 127.6 ± 35.3 ml/min or 1.9% of cardiac output. Occlusion of the bronchoesophageal artery reduced bronchial artery flow to near zero, whereas total systemic blood to the lung was reduced by only 55%. Blood flow to the intraparenchymal cartilaginous airways was reduced 60-90% after occlusion of the bronchoesophageal artery. Sheep, like most mammals, have multiple and complex systemic arterial inputs to the lungs. We conclude that multiple branches of the bronchoesophageal artery provide most but not all of the systemic blood flow to the intraparenchymal cartilaginous airways but that over one-half of the total systemic blood flow to sheep lung comes from sources other than the common bronchial artery.

AB - Discrepancies exist between experimental measurements of the systemic blood flow to sheep lung by use of microsphere techniques and flow probes on the bronchial artery. In these studies, we simultaneously measured the blood flow through the bronchial artery, using a transit time flow probe, and the systemic blood flow to left lung, using radioactive microspheres. All measurements were made on conscious sheep previously prepared with chronic catheterizations of the left atrium, aorta, and vena cava and a flow probe around the bronchial artery. Inflatable occluder cuffs were placed around the pulmonary and bronchoesophageal arteries. Bronchial artery blood flow in six sheep was 25.3 ± 5.2 ml/min or 0.4% of the cardiac output. Systemic blood flow to left lung, measured with microspheres, was 54.1 ± 14.2 ml/min. Calculated systemic blood flow to that portion of sheep lung perfused by the bronchial artery was 127.6 ± 35.3 ml/min or 1.9% of cardiac output. Occlusion of the bronchoesophageal artery reduced bronchial artery flow to near zero, whereas total systemic blood to the lung was reduced by only 55%. Blood flow to the intraparenchymal cartilaginous airways was reduced 60-90% after occlusion of the bronchoesophageal artery. Sheep, like most mammals, have multiple and complex systemic arterial inputs to the lungs. We conclude that multiple branches of the bronchoesophageal artery provide most but not all of the systemic blood flow to the intraparenchymal cartilaginous airways but that over one-half of the total systemic blood flow to sheep lung comes from sources other than the common bronchial artery.

KW - airways

KW - bronchial blood flow

KW - pulmonary circulation

KW - trachea

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026475037&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026475037&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 73

SP - 1996

EP - 2003

JO - Journal of Applied Physiology

JF - Journal of Applied Physiology

SN - 0161-7567

IS - 5

ER -